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No-data Group Title

What is the rule to get this list of ordered pairs : (0,0),(1,1),(2,1),(3,2),(4,2),(5,3),(6,3),...

  • 2 years ago
  • 2 years ago

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  1. TuringTest Group Title
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    perhaps whenever x is odd add one to y ?

    • 2 years ago
  2. TuringTest Group Title
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    ..or you want an equation?

    • 2 years ago
  3. ParthKohli Group Title
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    \(\Large \color{purple}{ 1) x + 1,y + 1 }\) \(\Large \color{purple}{ 2) x + 1, y }\) It keeps repeating.

    • 2 years ago
  4. No-data Group Title
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    and expression for the n-th term.

    • 2 years ago
  5. No-data Group Title
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    Well I actually got it from a while loop, and I wanted to know if I can translate it to a mathematical expression.

    • 2 years ago
  6. ParthKohli Group Title
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    No, you have to use the programming if - else, or while - do

    • 2 years ago
  7. TuringTest Group Title
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    should be like (n,n/2) when n is even and (n,n/2+1) when n is odd how to combine them (you using python?)

    • 2 years ago
  8. ParthKohli Group Title
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    @TuringTest lol, Do - while is in every language

    • 2 years ago
  9. TuringTest Group Title
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    I ask because I am learning python and wanted tips if No-Data is an expert ..sort of a separate Q

    • 2 years ago
  10. No-data Group Title
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    This is what it does: x = 0, y = 0 y = x - y x = x + 1

    • 2 years ago
  11. No-data Group Title
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    Sorry Turing I'm not a expert, I'm actually learning some Java, but I got distracted with this thing hehe.

    • 2 years ago
  12. No-data Group Title
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    thank you both.

    • 2 years ago
  13. amistre64 Group Title
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    what you have typed up is already a recurrsive definition; and it might have to be piecewise defined to be explicit as has already been pointed out

    • 2 years ago
  14. No-data Group Title
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    There is no way of expressing it without in the piecewise way?. I'm so fool because I can't see it from the code =/

    • 2 years ago
  15. amistre64 Group Title
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    if you are trying to confine yourself to a limited method, your going to be limited in your results .... the piecewise functions are real and useable function ... as is it looks like y is increaseing at half the rate of x, and if you can use a ceiling or floor function to weed it up or down as needed, you might be able to code it up sufficiently with a 0,0 condition as separate

    • 2 years ago
  16. amistre64 Group Title
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    if we ratio it out: \[1,2,1\frac{1}{2},2,1\frac{1}{3},2,1\frac{1}{4},2,1\frac{1}{5},2,1\frac{1}{6},...\]

    • 2 years ago
  17. amistre64 Group Title
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    \[f(x')=1+\frac{1}{x};\ x\in Odd\]\[f(x')=2;\ x\in Even\] prolly bad notations, but the slope of each discrete point would be something like this

    • 2 years ago
  18. amistre64 Group Title
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    1 + 1/n maybe better; for x in Odd

    • 2 years ago
  19. No-data Group Title
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    Thank you amistre64 I'll try to understand that.

    • 2 years ago
  20. No-data Group Title
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    I just th

    • 2 years ago
  21. No-data Group Title
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    I just thought it would be easier to do without piecewise functions, but now I see it is not.

    • 2 years ago
  22. amistre64 Group Title
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    computers are great with piecewises ;) good luck with it

    • 2 years ago
  23. TuringTest Group Title
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    sorry no-Data I had to take your medal away and give it to amistre... his was the best answer :P

    • 2 years ago
  24. No-data Group Title
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    No problem TuringTest I actually was asking for an answer and that is what amistre64 gave me.

    • 2 years ago
  25. No-data Group Title
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    Although I didn't know someone could change his mind about a medal.

    • 2 years ago
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