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ThaJokersRiddles

  • 3 years ago

How do you find the sides of a triangle if they only give you 1 side but all 3 degrees of the angles.

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  1. ThaJokersRiddles
    • 3 years ago
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    |dw:1336450108160:dw|

  2. Study23
    • 3 years ago
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    That's a special triangle. In the 30-60-90 triangle, the proportion of the sides are \(\ \sqrt{3}:1:2\), respectively.

  3. ThaJokersRiddles
    • 3 years ago
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    How would I solve for the sides though?

  4. Study23
    • 3 years ago
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    So in this case, that means: |dw:1336450392069:dw|

  5. Study23
    • 3 years ago
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    That means the side lengths are ....?

  6. ThaJokersRiddles
    • 3 years ago
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    7, 14, and 12?

  7. robtobey
    • 3 years ago
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    Use the Law of Sines http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Law_of_sines

  8. Study23
    • 3 years ago
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    Ummm... Well, you have 7, and 14, so substitute 7 as x in the shortest side, and get 7sqrt3. So the answer is \(\ \huge 7, 14, 7\sqrt{3} \).

  9. ThaJokersRiddles
    • 3 years ago
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    I thought that was 7*the sqrt of 3 lol

  10. Study23
    • 3 years ago
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    @robtobey I was going to suggest that at first; however, I think this method is equally as effective.

  11. Study23
    • 3 years ago
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    @ThaJokersRiddles Does this make sense to you now?

  12. ThaJokersRiddles
    • 3 years ago
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    Yea

  13. robtobey
    • 3 years ago
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    The problem statement does not infer a right triangle.

  14. Study23
    • 3 years ago
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    Great!

  15. Study23
    • 3 years ago
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    @robtobey, @ThaJokersRiddles drew the problem that indicates a right angle.

  16. robtobey
    • 3 years ago
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    Ok. I stand corrected.

  17. Study23
    • 3 years ago
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    However, the law of sines would be effective had this been a non-right triangle.

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