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goutham1995

  • 3 years ago

in c++ programming, the modulus function (%) can only be done for integer data types..why is that? i mean why cant yo use it for float?

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  1. RedPrince
    • 3 years ago
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    if you use %d then it is use for all data type but %i for integers, %c for characters and %s for strings But %d is use for all these data types!!

  2. goutham1995
    • 3 years ago
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    sure? because i never came across all those...

  3. bmp
    • 3 years ago
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    You can use, it's not just overloaded with %. Check fmod() : http://www.cplusplus.com/reference/clibrary/cmath/fmod/

  4. goutham1995
    • 3 years ago
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    oh then my book must be wrong..

  5. bmp
    • 3 years ago
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    Maybe it's because cmath is a external lib. C/C++ itself does not allow it, but, on the other hand, both are minimal languages: they don't have an I/O built-in. Well, anyway, hope I helped you, cmath is a nice lib :-)

  6. RedPrince
    • 3 years ago
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    Yes I am sure because i use all of these!!!!!!!!!

  7. slotema
    • 3 years ago
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    It kind of makes sense to me that floating point numbers are not supported by the modulo operation. The modulo operation gives you the remainder after an integer division (so 12 % 10 = 2). But what would be the remainder of a floating point division? Take e.g. 10 / 2.1 = 4.762. Apart from rounding errors, a floating point number is always fully divisible, so it won't have a remainder. What would be the point of a modulo operation without a remainder?

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