Quantcast

Got Homework?

Connect with other students for help. It's a free community.

  • across
    MIT Grad Student
    Online now
  • laura*
    Helped 1,000 students
    Online now
  • Hero
    College Math Guru
    Online now

Here's the question you clicked on:

55 members online
  • 0 replying
  • 0 viewing

bonjourjay Group Title

What interactions go on between the red blood cell and important molecules, cells, and organs?

  • 2 years ago
  • 2 years ago

  • This Question is Closed
  1. dylanrogers Group Title
    Best Response
    You've already chosen the best response.
    Medals 1

    im pretty sure red blood cells help with ur body they help right off stuff

    • 2 years ago
  2. dylanrogers Group Title
    Best Response
    You've already chosen the best response.
    Medals 1

    fight off sorry not right off

    • 2 years ago
  3. blues Group Title
    Best Response
    You've already chosen the best response.
    Medals 1

    @dylanrogers, I think you have confused red blood cells with white blood cells. White blood cells definitely fight off bacteria and other disease-causing organisms which get inside the body but red blood cells are involved with carrying dissolved gasses through the blood to the other tissues in the body.

    • 2 years ago
  4. dylanrogers Group Title
    Best Response
    You've already chosen the best response.
    Medals 1

    oh okay i knew it was one of them

    • 2 years ago
  5. blues Group Title
    Best Response
    You've already chosen the best response.
    Medals 1

    :D

    • 2 years ago
  6. Australopithecus Group Title
    Best Response
    You've already chosen the best response.
    Medals 2

    In summery Red blood cells carry oxygen from your lungs in a protein called hemoglobin (they are full of this protein) to the rest of the tissues in your body. Your body needs oxygen to act as an electron acceptor in the electron transport chain so it can produce ATP (cellular respiration). Hemoglobin also transports CO2 a waste product of cellular respiration out of the body. Extra info I wrote for the hell of it: Red blood cells carry oxygen throughout the body and CO2 out of the body, they contain a protein called hemoglobin which has a heme group (iron containing group). As Red blood cells pass through the lungs where it is exposed to a high concentration of oxygen, when this occurs the hemoglobin protein (a homotetramer) binds to up to four O2 (oxygen) molecules. The protein hemoglobin is a transport protein that exhibits cooperative binding meaning when one or two oxygen molecule binds to one or two of its binding sites respectively it has a chance of switching from a tense state (lower affinity for oxygen binding) to a relaxed state (higher affinity for binding to oxygen). So when the oxygenated hemoglobin enters the body it enters an area that has a lower concentration of oxygen. Thus the hemoglobin releases some of the oxygen it has bonded to it to the tissues in the body. The switching from relaxed to tense helps this process occur more efficiently. You might also be interested to know that when you enter an area with low atmospheric oxygen two things happen, your body produces more red blood cells and releases a hormone called BPG which fits into the center of the hemoglobin homotetramer (kind of like a lock into a key, where the lock is the positive center of the hemoglobin and the key is the negatively charged BPG). This prevents hemoglobin from entering the relaxed state, thus lowering its overall affinity for oxygen. This allows the hemoglobin to give up oxygen a lot more readily to the tissues of the body even though it is carrying a lot less oxygen due to the fact you are not breathing in as much oxygen.

    • 2 years ago
    • Attachments:

See more questions >>>

Your question is ready. Sign up for free to start getting answers.

spraguer (Moderator)
5 → View Detailed Profile

is replying to Can someone tell me what button the professor is hitting...

23

  • Teamwork 19 Teammate
  • Problem Solving 19 Hero
  • You have blocked this person.
  • ✔ You're a fan Checking fan status...

Thanks for being so helpful in mathematics. If you are getting quality help, make sure you spread the word about OpenStudy.

This is the testimonial you wrote.
You haven't written a testimonial for Owlfred.