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Thabo

What is a number

  • one year ago
  • one year ago

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  1. pratu043
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    A number is a number.

    • one year ago
  2. cesar2462
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    #

    • one year ago
  3. fallingangel
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    A numeral or group of numerals. The sum, total, count, or aggregate of a collection of units.

    • one year ago
  4. dogs_best1997
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    123467890 is the numbers

    • one year ago
  5. pratu043
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    It is something that is used for counting ...

    • one year ago
  6. glgan1
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    A number is a symbol.

    • one year ago
  7. dogs_best1997
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    A number is a concept from mathematics, used to count or measure.

    • one year ago
  8. vamgadu
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    its the alphabet of a language . +1 @glgan1

    • one year ago
  9. estudier
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    Depending on who you believe, it's a set (and so is everything else)

    • one year ago
  10. Thabo
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    Guys, a simple but mathematical explanation

    • one year ago
  11. dogs_best1997
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    Natural numbers are the numbers which we normally use for counting, 1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 7, 8, 9, 10

    • one year ago
  12. fallingangel
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    What I said. A numeral or group of numerals. The sum, total, count, or aggregate of a collection of units.

    • one year ago
  13. estudier
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    Is sqrt 2 a number?

    • one year ago
  14. shubhamsrg
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    google over or go for wikipedia for orthodox results..

    • one year ago
  15. Thabo
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    Ok. a number is a measure of quantity

    • one year ago
  16. estudier
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    "Ok. a number is a measure of quantity" So 2 is a measure of 2?

    • one year ago
  17. Thabo
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    Yes, a "simple" as that

    • one year ago
  18. estudier
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    That isn't simple, it is circular and doesn't mean anything...

    • one year ago
  19. Thabo
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    How is my definition wrong

    • one year ago
  20. estudier
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    It is the same as saying 2=2 which is not wrong, just devoid of meaning.

    • one year ago
  21. estudier
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    That's an improvement....what is "arithmetical"?

    • one year ago
  22. estudier
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    Now you have gone all circular as well...:-)

    • one year ago
  23. Thabo
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    Give us your definition then

    • one year ago
  24. estudier
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    I already said, if you don't want to take the "naturals" as given, then you canuse a set theoretical construction of number, starting withy the empty set.

    • one year ago
  25. Thabo
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    I don't understand you

    • one year ago
  26. estudier
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    Assuming you want a "mathematical" definition of number, then you need to find a way to use set theory to do it because that is the currently accepted foundation for mathematics.

    • one year ago
  27. Thabo
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    I just wanted to know what is a number according to you guys that all

    • one year ago
  28. estudier
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    Mathematically, it is a set.

    • one year ago
  29. estudier
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    "properties of the natural and real numbers can be derived within set theory, as each number system can be identified with a set of equivalence classes under a suitable equivalence relation whose field is some infinite set" http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Set_theory#Axiomatic_set_theory

    • one year ago
  30. Thabo
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    oh, that a pretty interesting definition. Thanks

    • one year ago
  31. estudier
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    Normally, for day to day mathematics, you don't really need this. Another way is just to take the naturals (beginning with 0 or 1 according to taste) as being somehow "God given" and then get everything else from those.

    • one year ago
  32. Thabo
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    Ok. thanks everyone!

    • one year ago
  33. SmoothMath
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    This is really almost an epistemology question more than a mathematical one. Mathematics solves problems based on the foreknowledge of numbers and counting. At least for the common man, knowledge of numbers is axiomatic, it is understood knowledge that other knowledge can be derived from.

    • one year ago
  34. hreeg97
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    an arithmetical value, expressed by a word, symbol, or figure, representing a particular quantity and used in counting and making calculations and for showing order in a series or for identification

    • one year ago
  35. UnkleRhaukus
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    A number is a measurement without units

    • one year ago
  36. Thabo
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    Oh, not what do you mean?

    • one year ago
  37. UnkleRhaukus
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    Numbers come from measurements, i.e. from the comparison of a selection of reality with a scale or rule, where the selection is best represented on the scale, is designated a number, to distinguish it from another place on the scale

    • one year ago
  38. Thabo
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    Yes, I like that word "comparison"

    • one year ago
  39. UnkleRhaukus
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    i really like this question

    • one year ago
  40. UnkleRhaukus
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    would numbers mean anything at all if well didn't use the same scales?

    • one year ago
  41. JoJo-Phoenix
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    A number shows the amount of something and was created to show how much something was.

    • one year ago
  42. JoJo-Phoenix
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    For instance, many thousand years ago people had animals, and then they suddenly wanted to count them, so they created the first numbers, just some line that show the amount

    • one year ago
  43. Thabo
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    There would be trouble in this world without "comparison"

    • one year ago
  44. SmoothMath
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    The truth is, numbers, just like words, are defined arbitrarily, but are useful for human communication of ideas that are inherent in reality.

    • one year ago
  45. UnkleRhaukus
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    truth is a binary measurement , requiring a measurer , such as a person

    • one year ago
  46. UnkleRhaukus
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    0=False 1=True, are these arbitrary, @SmoothMath

    • one year ago
  47. SmoothMath
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    Yes.

    • one year ago
  48. UnkleRhaukus
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    i think so too

    • one year ago
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