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SmoothMath

Students, what is your opinion? Would you like to study in a "flipped classroom?"

  • one year ago
  • one year ago

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  1. SmoothMath
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    In a traditional classroom, the classroom time is spent watching the teacher teach, and the practice is mostly done at home as "homework." In a "flipped" classroom, your homework is to watch videos online of the teacher teaching. When you come in to class, that is when you do your practice, or what you would traditionally call your "homework." Do you think you'd like being in this kind of classroom? Would you learn well? Would you watch the videos? What benefits and drawbacks do you think there would be? Thanks in advance for your opinions!

    • one year ago
  2. nbouscal
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    Yeah, I have liked this idea a lot ever since I heard Khan talk about it at TED.

    • one year ago
  3. SmoothMath
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    Brief note to mods; This kind of question is the reason we need an education section.

    • one year ago
  4. Qwerty90
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    Can you help me on my problem right above yours?

    • one year ago
  5. Callisto
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    *Dislike Google snap :|* Here's my PERSONAL opinion.. Personally, I don't like studying in a "flipped classroom'' . When I learn at home, there's a higher chance that I get distracted. (for example, when I watch the video lecture of the MIT course, I can't concentrate, eg, my mum will ask me to do the household chores when I'm watching the videos) So, for me, the learning efficiency and effectiveness is quite low. Moreover, I think practice should be done at home. It is wasting my time if I have to spend my whole lesson just doing 'homework' since it's just personal practice. Though, I can't deny that little practice in the lesson can help check if I understand what my teacher has taught. In addition, I don't think I can ask if I have problems when I'm learning through watching videos. If I can ask immediately, I can understand it easier and have a better memory of it. Probably, I think learning alone will give me less driving force to learn.. But certainly, there are some advantages of learning through videos. One of them is that I can't replay the video when I can't catch up. So, I can jot down everything I need. Also, I can watch it more than once, which enables me to refresh my memory. Anyway, I knew nothing of flipped classroom before looking at this post, so I can't tell if it is good :|

    • one year ago
  6. cibychak
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    well,in my school we follow such a method only.

    • one year ago
  7. SmoothMath
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    Well, by golly sir, what do you think of it?

    • one year ago
  8. cibychak
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    Its fun,of course

    • one year ago
  9. SmoothMath
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    Oh, yeah? And do students watch the videos? Is there any accountability? Do the teachers know if you have or not? Is it hard to learn from them without being distracted?

    • one year ago
  10. cibychak
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    We stayed in a hostel,and we were all focused in a common goal:to get through iit-jee(a competitive exam).so,it was not a problem

    • one year ago
  11. DeadMau5!
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    I would like that alot :D

    • one year ago
  12. Mechmasta
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    deadmau5 for the win! and yes that would be snazzy

    • one year ago
  13. jazy
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    that sounds like a good idea:) That way you only have to hear the teacher explain the things you don't understand...

    • one year ago
  14. KingGeorge
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    I'm going to agree with Callisto for the most part. In this flipped classroom I would probably have much less motivation to learn the material in general. However, some subjects that I greatly enjoy (aka mathematics) I already have the necessary motivation to learn the material by myself, and going into class to work on "homework" with other people could be a great benefit if I don't understand the material. Then again, if I already understood the material, there would be little reason to go to class other than building social skills.

    • one year ago
  15. nbouscal
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    @KingGeorge For reference, the common strategy in this method is to have the students who already understand the material help mentor their peers who are struggling with it.

    • one year ago
  16. SmoothMath
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    Which is an awesome idea to me because it means more people getting individual attention, and it also means that those people who THINK that they know it well have to try and explain it now, which makes you really understand it well.

    • one year ago
  17. jazy
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    @KingGeorge that is a good point if you don't understand the material.. @nbouscal I completely agree! I've been three years taking online math. Yet I still like interacting to understand math. If I have someone explaining something new step-by-step it helps me memorize things much faster. But its agonizing having to go over the same material over and over for the "benfit of the class". I like helping when I can help, and being helped when I need it.

    • one year ago
  18. jazy
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    *benefit

    • one year ago
  19. nbouscal
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    That's my favorite part about it, teaching is the best way to learn, so if you think you know it but then realize you can't teach it, turns out you don't actually know it. Also good training for people who will go into academia, have them start teaching early :P

    • one year ago
  20. jazy
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    @nbouscal agreed! Turns out I actually do that help myself memorize math. I go to my cousin(she in college classes at 16) and explain myself. She corrects me if I'm wrong and I learn best this way:)

    • one year ago
  21. SmoothMath
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    I'm trying to think of a way that I could make the online sessions A) Interesting and engaging B) Less prone to distraction (I know that if I'm watching a 30 minute lecture, I've got other tabs open) C) Something that I can monitor who has completed it

    • one year ago
  22. SmoothMath
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    I've thought of, instead of doing 1 long video, doing shorter clips with short activities or 2-3 question quizzes between.

    • one year ago
  23. jazy
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    Elluminate Live?

    • one year ago
  24. nbouscal
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    Yeah, I think one of the reasons Khan is successful is he always limits himself to short clips. You can see whenever he makes a video that's ~20min, everyone complains about it :P

    • one year ago
  25. timo86m
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    Well WHen I was young I went to a very ghetto school in the south side of phoenix. Being smart was very frowned upon. I needed glasses. Which was a recipe for getting beat up everyday. I am 26 now. that was years ago. I couldn't see nothing on the board therefore see nothing the teacher was teaching. So i came to rely heavily on books. Cuzz I can see books. TO this day I learn better from books. I prefer them over a teacher. Teachers are obsolete in my opinion. Well at least to me.

    • one year ago
  26. SmoothMath
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    It hurts to be obsolete. =(

    • one year ago
  27. nbouscal
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    Timo, your experience, while typical for a lot of us "smart kids," is merely anecdotal and does not really constitute a real critique of teachers and classes in general.

    • one year ago
  28. KingGeorge
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    I have to disagree with @timo86m. There are some subjects that I could definitely learn from a book, but other subjects seem nigh impossible to learn only from a book.

    • one year ago
  29. timo86m
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    It is a critique. I learn better from books. Maybe not all people do but I definately do. It will save hundred of man hours if everyone did. I love teachers tho. It takes a special kind kind of person to do that. For the pay they get.

    • one year ago
  30. jazy
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    I've had great teachers so far. Some ARE complicated, but I guess that all depends... I like books to learn as well...I pretty much adapt to anything when it comes to learning:) But sometimes its just easier having someone there to explain...or openstudy members lol:D

    • one year ago
  31. timo86m
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    I am and autodidact :) But I guess not by choice but out of necessity.

    • one year ago
  32. nbouscal
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    Yeah, to be honest timo, I have a very hard time believing that you actually learn better from a book than from a good teacher. Maybe you haven't yet had any good teachers, or maybe you haven't yet run up against any truly difficult subjects. I agree with George that some subjects are almost impossible to learn without someone to help you through it.

    • one year ago
  33. SmoothMath
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    I can believe that you learn better by reading. It happens, but just know that it is rare. Not very many people learn well by reading or "teaching themselves." So to say that people should just read to learn is not a very viable option. Teachers will always be necessary, though it's likely that the way we teach will change. Open Study foreshadows that.

    • one year ago
  34. nbouscal
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    I learn very well by reading, and by teaching myself. I used to use that method exclusively. Then I finally hit a difficult course, and ran straight into a brick wall. Now I use lectures as well as books, because I know that I am not invincible, and I do need help to learn some things.

    • one year ago
  35. SmoothMath
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    I had the same experience, nbouscal. I remember in my high school math courses, I would play around all day every day. Then, if there was a quiz that day, I would read the book for 5 minutes and get an A. Kind of ridiculous. Naturally, I didn't have much success with that method in many of my college math courses.

    • one year ago
  36. nbouscal
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    Yeah, I slept in almost every one of my classes in high school. It was sleep or listen to the teacher, and since the teacher was talking about things I had learned weeks ago, I chose sleep. Once I started studying real math, it was a different ballgame :P

    • one year ago
  37. timo86m
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    " Maybe you haven't yet had any good teachers, or maybe you haven't yet run up against any truly difficult subjects." like what?

    • one year ago
  38. SmoothMath
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    Difficult is subjective.

    • one year ago
  39. nbouscal
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    Difficult starts somewhere different for every person. I can say generally, though, that graduate-level maths are almost universally difficult. The number of people who can self-study graduate-level maths successfully is vanishingly small.

    • one year ago
  40. nbouscal
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    To clarify: graduate studies can and must be very self-driven, but I'm talking about doing it without any kind of support system other than a book.

    • one year ago
  41. SmoothMath
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    Let epsilon be the number of students capable of self-teaching graduate level mathematics.

    • one year ago
  42. jazy
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    @SmoothMath what level math do you teach?

    • one year ago
  43. SmoothMath
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    It's my first year, and I'm a substitute doing various long-term math positions for people on maternity leave and that kind of thing. Currently I have precalculus and AP calculus courses.

    • one year ago
  44. nbouscal
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    Calc your first year teaching? Bravo, man, usually that's a sought-after spot isn't it?

    • one year ago
  45. timo86m
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    "To clarify: graduate studies can and must be very self-driven, but I'm talking about doing it without any kind of support system other than a book."" Sounds like that kind of stuff is built for people like me :D

    • one year ago
  46. nbouscal
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    I think it's built for people like you after you hit the realization that you can't do it yourself. If you try to do it yourself, the odds are extraordinarily good that you'll fail.

    • one year ago
  47. nbouscal
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    Sorry to be so negative, that's just the reality (in my view, anyway). Anyways, off to work, will follow up with this convo later.

    • one year ago
  48. jazy
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    Wow! That's pretty cool:)

    • one year ago
  49. SmoothMath
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    Yeah =) I enjoy teaching calc. It's fun.

    • one year ago
  50. precal
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    I have seen students in an online high school. Unfortunately many did not listen to the videos, they pretended to watch them and listen to music with their earbuds or played youtube videos in the background. I also, saw some just copy and past the questions into google to select what they thought was the correct solution. Accountability has to be present and teachers need to have the power to block the secondary sites. The online experience needs to provide interactive items. Also, students online should be able to interact with one another. Just my 2 cents

    • one year ago
  51. timo86m
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    "I think it's built for people like you after you hit the realization that you can't do it yourself. If you try to do it yourself, the odds are extraordinarily good that you'll fail. " Anything can be done if someone has been there already and they left nice directions :D AKA textbook.

    • one year ago
  52. precal
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    yes, I do believe in the power of books. Knowledge is important. I do believe there is a place for interactive websites. A little of everything is good. People have to find their style of learning.

    • one year ago
  53. timo86m
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    My style is books :)

    • one year ago
  54. Callisto
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    Getting individual attention is good for learning. Though, there is a problem I've encountered. The smartest student in my class is very active in asking questions in class. Apart from teaching, my teacher actually spent most of the time answering for her questions in class. But it's quite annoying when my teacher just focused on helping one/two students in class and seemed to neglect the others (though I know she's not!) So, finally, we have to ask her after the classes... Teaching is the best way to learn <- couldn't agree more!!!!! Perhaps I'm not a good self-learner. I always get into troubles when I learn alone, so usually, I turn to my teacher, who helps understand the subject more. Despite the fact that you're a good self-learner and you love certain subjects (for instance, math), usually, as I've mentioned, you don't have a high motivation to learn - perhaps just want to get a pass, then say farewell to math. In that case, I think they won't pay attention to the video (ah... @precal mentioned that in his/her post) So, when they come to class again, the biggest problem they have is that they don't understand a thing and you'll have to explain all over again (perhaps) Interactive is definitely the key element in studying in a 'flipped classroom' Good luck with teaching~~~~

    • one year ago
  55. SmoothMath
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    Thank you very much =) Your feedback is helpful.

    • one year ago
  56. timo86m
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    I am also very shy and dont ask questions. It is another reason I came to rely on books early on my childhood.

    • one year ago
  57. Callisto
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    Hmm... I am shy too.. But since I did really bad in math 6 years ago, I decided to have a little change.. Just to bother my math teacher and ask as many questions as possible- before the class, during the recess, lunch and even after school every day (Yea.. I'm that annoying) I'm so lucky to have good math teachers who are willing to answer my stupid questions!! Soon, I caught up with the class and even learn faster than my classmates. Instead of sleeping in the classes (well I've never tried :|), I read the later part of the book while my teacher is teaching (sounds disrespect.. but it's better than sleeping?!) and also listened to my teacher in case I needed to jot down something important. Oh... I miss my math lessons!!! (sorry that's irrelevant to the post :|) After all, it really depends on the students - if they want to learn or not..

    • one year ago
  58. timo86m
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    Well luckily for me in the end reading comprehension really turned out to be a great thing.

    • one year ago
  59. jazy
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    "After all, it really depends on the students - if they want to learn or not.." That is very true⇪

    • one year ago
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