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Sandiego19

Can Someone Please Explain Me In Steps How To Solve For a and b ?

  • one year ago
  • one year ago

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  1. Sandiego19
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    |dw:1337230739451:dw|

    • one year ago
  2. Sandiego19
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    the numbers are 29, 20, 21

    • one year ago
  3. sritama
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    is it a right angled triangle ??/

    • one year ago
  4. nickymarden
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    all you have to do is use similarity. see what angles are the same.

    • one year ago
  5. nickymarden
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    and then use proportions. As you can see, the sides 29 and b are proportional, because the hypotenuse of the two similar triangles. same goes ofr the other sides. like this: actually it's 29/b=20/21=21/a for b: 29/b=20/21 b=(20/21)29 for a: 21/a=20/21 a=(20/21)21 get it?

    • one year ago
  6. Sandiego19
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    Yes Thanks Alot :)

    • one year ago
  7. jim_thompson5910
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    you have the right idea nickymarden, but you have the wrong values It should be a/20 = 20/21 which after solving for 'a' gives you a = 400/21 and b/20 = 29/21 which gives you b = 580/21

    • one year ago
  8. nickymarden
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    haha, yeah you're right. sorry. it's 2 am here, can't blame me..

    • one year ago
  9. jim_thompson5910
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    But I love this way better. I was set to use the pythagorean theorem until you wrote that lol

    • one year ago
  10. SmoothMath
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    I don't think there is any way to. Is there, Jim?

    • one year ago
  11. Sandiego19
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    SO , A = 400/21 And B = 580/21

    • one year ago
  12. nickymarden
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    yes love, i'm sorry. @jim_thompson5910 is right :)

    • one year ago
  13. Sandiego19
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    its okay thanks

    • one year ago
  14. jim_thompson5910
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    what do you mean SmoothMath?

    • one year ago
  15. SmoothMath
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    I don't think that good ol' Pythag can solve this problem.

    • one year ago
  16. jim_thompson5910
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    Since we have two right triangles, we can say b^2 + 29^2 = (21+a)^2 and a^2+20^2 = b^2 So we have a system of two equations with 2 unknowns. This means we can solve for a and b.

    • one year ago
  17. SmoothMath
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    Except that you're assuming this is a right angle, and that is not given: |dw:1337232422096:dw|

    • one year ago
  18. SmoothMath
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    Ah, but it can be proven.

    • one year ago
  19. jim_thompson5910
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    exactly

    • one year ago
  20. SmoothMath
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    Very good.

    • one year ago
  21. jim_thompson5910
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    it's not explicit, but the fact that the two triangles are similar allows us to use either method

    • one year ago
  22. SmoothMath
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    But a roundabout way to solve it indeed. Haha, funny that it's the first way you thought of.

    • one year ago
  23. jim_thompson5910
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    lol just been using it a lot more than the other method I guess

    • one year ago
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