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tanvidais13

  • 3 years ago

Imagine, there's a cubic graph which has already been plotted, and imagine they want you to graphically plot it's inverse. In which line do you have to reflect it??

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  1. Aadarsh
    • 3 years ago
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    Do u mean this graph?

  2. Aadarsh
    • 3 years ago
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    |dw:1337492052470:dw|

  3. tanvidais13
    • 3 years ago
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    I mean, literally ANY graph :P

  4. Aadarsh
    • 3 years ago
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    So, is my graph correct?

  5. tanvidais13
    • 3 years ago
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    yeahh, i guess :P wait is this the cubic graph, or the line in which it hsa to be reflected in, or the reflected cubic graph?? i'm confused :P

  6. apoorvk
    • 3 years ago
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    The graph of inverse of any function is just the same graph that is its mirror image about the 'y=x' line - basically flipped about the 'diagonal'.

  7. apoorvk
    • 3 years ago
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    (ofcourse provided that the function if bijective and the inverse exists)

  8. apoorvk
    • 3 years ago
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    Yeah, and so in you y=x^3 graph, the curve of the inverse is simply flipped about 'y=x' something like this: (I think I need to draw a new curve): |dw:1337492674235:dw|

  9. apoorvk
    • 3 years ago
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    |dw:1337492883274:dw| That's^^ the inverse of y=x^3, or basically the graph of y=x^(1/3) (in black)

  10. Aadarsh
    • 3 years ago
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    Yeah. @apoorvk is right. Yesterday, our maths sir taught this. Thanks Tanvi for helping me to revise my concepts. :P

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