anonymous
  • anonymous
Ok I been lifting weights a while. And I have this theory that if I where to simulate a push up. I would have to get on a scale and that should be the weight I need to use? I'll show figure.
Physics
  • Stacey Warren - Expert brainly.com
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SOLVED
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schrodinger
  • schrodinger
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anonymous
  • anonymous
|dw:1337572227437:dw|
anonymous
  • anonymous
dont laugh at my drawing :P
anonymous
  • anonymous
You want to do the bench press in such a way that it mimiks as push-up?

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anonymous
  • anonymous
Kinda of yes.
anonymous
  • anonymous
Then sure. Assume the push-up position on a scale. Do not actually do a push-up, as the scale will read higher as you do the exercise, due to Newton's Second and Third Laws. For thoroughness, I might suggest getting the scale reading at both the "arms fully extended" position, and the "arms fully contracted position." That is to say, read the scale at the top and bottom of the push-up, while you are stationary. If they differ, take the mean and throw that weight on your workout equipment.
anonymous
  • anonymous
that is what I had in mind :)
anonymous
  • anonymous
Good thinking. A hint: Lift your elbows towards your ears so they are level with your shoulders when doing a push-up. It will isolate your pectorials which are stronger than your triceps. |dw:1337651048367:dw|
anonymous
  • anonymous
i think that he should look at the reading at its mag when doing push ups. the reading the scale shows when doing a push up would be the weight that he is lifting while in motion. For example, it is harder to lift a 50lb block with an acceleration of 6 ft/s than at .5 ft/s
anonymous
  • anonymous
the weight is increased due to that the fact that yur are trying to combat gravit more rapidly.
anonymous
  • anonymous
I understand that, but he wants to simulate the weight of a push-up. He will accelerate the mass the same whether he is doing a push-up or a chest press exercise.
anonymous
  • anonymous
oh alright, makes sense
Kainui
  • Kainui
I'm just curious if the inverse cosine of your weight at the top of the pushup divided by the weight at the bottom of the pushup is equal to the angle at which you move in doing a pushup.
Vincent-Lyon.Fr
  • Vincent-Lyon.Fr
Eashmore already got the answer right 17 days ago!
anonymous
  • anonymous
@Kainui Not likely. Your mass times gravity will always be in the vertical component. Any angle shift from 90 would just result in a friction component that resisted your arms from sliding out from under you. Therefore, we will see a greater load through the arms, but not much variation on the scale.

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