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zaphod

  • 3 years ago

help needed

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  1. zaphod
    • 3 years ago
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    http://screencast.com/t/QYm83Dcv

  2. zaphod
    • 3 years ago
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    @Callisto @Ishaan94 @shivam_bhalla @cshalvey

  3. heena
    • 3 years ago
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    qn?

  4. zaphod
    • 3 years ago
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    its there on the attached link

  5. heena
    • 3 years ago
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    momentum or moment of inertia??

  6. zaphod
    • 3 years ago
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    momentum

  7. zaphod
    • 3 years ago
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    i need to know the perpendicular distance

  8. Frank_Shank
    • 3 years ago
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    heena, moment means torque

  9. Callisto
    • 3 years ago
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    Measure from the picture...

  10. Frank_Shank
    • 3 years ago
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    god job~ Callisto

  11. zaphod
    • 3 years ago
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    from where to where, thats wht i need

  12. Callisto
    • 3 years ago
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    I think... from A to B... not the direct one, but the distance perpendicular to the weight, I think...

  13. zaphod
    • 3 years ago
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    |dw:1337869363517:dw|

  14. Callisto
    • 3 years ago
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    Yes, I think,

  15. zaphod
    • 3 years ago
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    are you sure?

  16. shivam_bhalla
    • 3 years ago
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    Yes . It is write.

  17. Frank_Shank
    • 3 years ago
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    Callisto is right!!

  18. shivam_bhalla
    • 3 years ago
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    *right

  19. Callisto
    • 3 years ago
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    Nope, I'm not sure. I did bad in my physics exam :S I just remember the formula Moment = FxD(perpendicular) So, D should be the horizontal one (counting from the pivot to the force) in this case

  20. zaphod
    • 3 years ago
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    how much did u score for ur exam?

  21. Callisto
    • 3 years ago
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    Don't want to mention it.. I'm sorry... :S

  22. shivam_bhalla
    • 3 years ago
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    Right @Callisto

  23. Callisto
    • 3 years ago
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    BTW, the question is asking moment of the force Moment = Fd⊥ But momentum is another thing momentum = mv ...

  24. shivam_bhalla
    • 3 years ago
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    moment = torque= (perpendicular distance) x (Force)

  25. Callisto
    • 3 years ago
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    So... when heena asked 'momentum or moment of inertia??' it should not be momentum..

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