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shrutihiray

  • 3 years ago

a soln of sodium metal in liquid ammonia is strongly reducing due to the presence of -- a - sodium atoms b- sodium hydride c- sodium amide d- solvated electrons which is the right option??

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  1. priyadabas
    • 3 years ago
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    Sodium electrons.

  2. Aadarsh
    • 3 years ago
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    But how? can u explain me?

  3. priyadabas
    • 3 years ago
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    The electrostatic forces of attraction are very less in Na as it's an alkali metal n radius is large so the last electron is not in the hold of nucleus means it can loose the electron easily, which makes it highly reactive.;

  4. shrutihiray
    • 3 years ago
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    @priyadabas but did u think over the presence of ammonia...sodium amide too can b the ans

  5. priyadabas
    • 3 years ago
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    Sodium is the most reactive metal. Yes it myt help.

  6. Vincent-Lyon.Fr
    • 3 years ago
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    solvated electrons

  7. yash2651995
    • 3 years ago
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    yup.. Na'selectrons.. find the detailed mechanism of bouvealt blanc reduction to see it in action :P

  8. Carl_Pham
    • 3 years ago
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    Vincent is correct. The case of solvated electrons in ammonia is a famous study subject in physical chemistry.

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