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lilli.m221

  • 2 years ago

The human GM-CSF gene and the mouse GM-CSF gene vary by more than 60% in their DNA sequence. However, when scientists place the human gene into mice, it functions properly. What best explains why this happens? The difference between genes sequences does not change the structure of the proteins. Mice can make human protein without the use of the human GM-CSF gene. The mouse DNA is a mutated form of the human GM-CSF gene. The resulting proteins made by the human gene are similar to the proteins made by the mouse gene. I think it's C...

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  1. Carniel
    • 2 years ago
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    Process of elimination. It couldn't be A cause it not relating to the general question. It can't be B since that is false.

  2. Carniel
    • 2 years ago
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    If you think about the other two, you can answer it :D

  3. lilli.m221
    • 2 years ago
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    Well, is it C?

  4. blues
    • 2 years ago
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    The problem tells you that there are two distinct versions of the gene: the human form and the mouse form. One is not a somehow mutated or intermediate copy of the other...

  5. lilli.m221
    • 2 years ago
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    So.. D?

  6. blues
    • 2 years ago
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    The proteins are similar in sequence (roughly) and in structure - therefore they can function in a very similar way. I think the purpose of the question is to show you that proteins can have similar structures, even if their sequences vary quite a bit, because sometimes different codons code for the same amino acid in the protein. So yes, D.

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