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shahzadjalbani

  • 2 years ago

Explain what are polynomials?

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  1. lgbasallote
    • 2 years ago
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    a group of terms with a variable and a constant

  2. lgbasallote
    • 2 years ago
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    that's the simplest i can put it

  3. shahzadjalbani
    • 2 years ago
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    Would you like to elaborate it? @lgbasallote

  4. nbouscal
    • 2 years ago
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    A polynomial is an expression that consists only of the addition, subtraction, and multiplication of non-negative integer exponents of variables and constants. They look like: x^2+2x+1, or x-50, or x^5+x^4+x^3+x^2+x+1

  5. nbouscal
    • 2 years ago
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    So, you can't have 1/x as a term, for example. You can't have x^2/3 as a term either. But you can have x taken to any natural number power.

  6. shahzadjalbani
    • 2 years ago
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    can we call y=x^2 as polynomial

  7. lgbasallote
    • 2 years ago
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    ^that's an elaboration

  8. nbouscal
    • 2 years ago
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    x^2 is a polynomial. Polynomials are expressions, not equations

  9. lgbasallote
    • 2 years ago
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    that is a polynomial function

  10. ParthKohli
    • 2 years ago
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    Also, a negative power can't be a polynomial because then that includes division.

  11. nbouscal
    • 2 years ago
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    Generally we name them after the number of terms they have, also. So if it is x+1, it's a binomial. x^2+x+1 is a trinomial. More than three terms is a polynomial.

  12. lgbasallote
    • 2 years ago
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    what qualifies polynomials is that the degree MUST be a non-negative integer (i.e. 1, 2, 3, 4, 5)

  13. shahzadjalbani
    • 2 years ago
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    Give me basic definations of expression ,equation and further more if you remeber? @nbouscal

  14. nbouscal
    • 2 years ago
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    0 is also okay for the degree because then it's the constant term :P

  15. nbouscal
    • 2 years ago
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    Expression doesn't have an =, equation does have an =

  16. lgbasallote
    • 2 years ago
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    so 2 is a polynomial...it has a degree of zero x is a polynomial with degree 1 x^2 is polynomial with dgree 2 and so on

  17. shahzadjalbani
    • 2 years ago
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    The what about x^2.5 @lgbasallote

  18. lgbasallote
    • 2 years ago
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    equations contain equal signs nuff said

  19. ParthKohli
    • 2 years ago
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    2 has a degree of 1.

  20. lgbasallote
    • 2 years ago
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    since it has a decimal point it is not @shahzadjalbani

  21. lgbasallote
    • 2 years ago
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    the degree has to be INTEGERS (non-negative)...which means whole numbers

  22. nbouscal
    • 2 years ago
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    the exponent has to be a natural number. A number in the set {0,1,2,...}. No fractions or decimals or negatives allowed

  23. lgbasallote
    • 2 years ago
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    @ParthKohli 2 has a degree of 0

  24. lgbasallote
    • 2 years ago
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    you look at the exponent of the variable...the exponent of the variable in 2 is 2x^0

  25. ParthKohli
    • 2 years ago
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    I see but the highest power is 1.

  26. lgbasallote
    • 2 years ago
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    *facepalm*

  27. ParthKohli
    • 2 years ago
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    \( \color{Black}{\Rightarrow 2^1 \times x^0 }\)

  28. shahzadjalbani
    • 2 years ago
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    Thank you all I got it .................!

  29. ParthKohli
    • 2 years ago
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    \( \color{Black}{\Rightarrow x \ne 0 \text{ btw} }\)

  30. lgbasallote
    • 2 years ago
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    The degree of a (nonzero) constant term is 0 source http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Polynomial

  31. ParthKohli
    • 2 years ago
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    Oopsie

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