Open study

is now brainly

With Brainly you can:

  • Get homework help from millions of students and moderators
  • Learn how to solve problems with step-by-step explanations
  • Share your knowledge and earn points by helping other students
  • Learn anywhere, anytime with the Brainly app!

A community for students.

Is there any equation to calculate the prime numbers?

Mathematics
I got my questions answered at brainly.com in under 10 minutes. Go to brainly.com now for free help!
At vero eos et accusamus et iusto odio dignissimos ducimus qui blanditiis praesentium voluptatum deleniti atque corrupti quos dolores et quas molestias excepturi sint occaecati cupiditate non provident, similique sunt in culpa qui officia deserunt mollitia animi, id est laborum et dolorum fuga. Et harum quidem rerum facilis est et expedita distinctio. Nam libero tempore, cum soluta nobis est eligendi optio cumque nihil impedit quo minus id quod maxime placeat facere possimus, omnis voluptas assumenda est, omnis dolor repellendus. Itaque earum rerum hic tenetur a sapiente delectus, ut aut reiciendis voluptatibus maiores alias consequatur aut perferendis doloribus asperiores repellat.

Join Brainly to access

this expert answer

SIGN UP FOR FREE
Nope
do you mean a formula to verify if it is prime?
Yes.....

Not the answer you are looking for?

Search for more explanations.

Ask your own question

Other answers:

There are a lot of methods for finding prime numbers, but it's not that easy, there's no function to check if any number is prime without having a list of prime numbers to use
Sieve of Eratosthenes is a good place to start if you want to research this area
i can come up with a formula impromptu....o.O
but yeah...there isnt any im familiar of
Easiest way: check if it's divisible by any natural number or not :P
Trust me the number theorists would love if there was an easy formula to verify primality :P
So far, there isn't. If there was the Reimann Hypothesis wouldn't be as big of a deal as it is.
I see something interesting. http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Lucas%E2%80%93Lehmer_primality_test
here is a list of *some* prime numbers if itll help: 2, 3, 5, 7, 11, 13, 17, 19, 23, 29, 31, 37, 41, 43, 47, 53, 59, 61, 67, 71, 73, 79, 83, 89, 97, 101, 103, 107, 109, 113, 127, 131, 137, 139, 149, 151, 157, 163, 167, 173, 179, 181, 191, 193, 197, 199, 211, 223, 227, 229, 233, 239, 241, 251, 257, 263, 269, 271, 277, 281, 283, 293, 307, 311, 313, 317, 331, 337, 347, 349, 353, 359, 367, 373, 379, 383, 389, 397, 401, 409, 419, 421, 431, 433, 439, 443, 449, 457, 461, 463, 467, 479, 487, 491, 499, 503, 509, 521, 523, 541, 547, 557, 563, 569, 571, 577, 587, 593, 599, 601, 607, 613, 617, 619, 631, 641, 643, 647, 653, 659, 661, 673, 677, 683, 691, 701, 709, 719, 727, 733, 739, 743, 751, 757, 761, 769, 773, 787, 797, 809, 811, 821, 823, 827, 829, 839, 853, 857, 859, 863, 877, 881, 883, 887, 907, 911, 919, 929, 937, 941, 947, 953, 967, 971, 977, 983, 991, 997
Yeah parth that is for Mersenne primes only, though
^ spam. It didnt help
are you good now @shahzadjalbani ?
@lgbasallote You sent a list of numbers now I have to compare each number with this list it will more difficult and lengthy job . Is there any simple way to do it .
There is not a simple way with the primes. The primes are not simple. That's why people are still studying them :)
my way is bloodily and manually divide a number by the simplest prime numbers (2, 3, 5, 7, 11) if i get a quotient with no remainder it is not prime....if there is a remainder...i have no way f knowing so i give up and say true lol
i have no way of knowing because the number could be divisible by the succeeding prime numbers or it could be just prime
One important method when determining if a number is prime is to bound the potential divisors by the square root of the number you're investigating. Once you hit that bound, you know it's prime.
but normally...if the number is not divisible by the basic prime numbers then it is prime...teachers are not that sadistic to have you try each one
@nbouscal explain your statement.
Well, any integer divisors come in pairs, right? So if you're looking at the number 20, for example, you have pairs 1,20; 2, 10; 4, 5... then you have 5,4; 10,2; 20,1... but you already had those, just backwards. So if you're checking primes, and you check 1, 2, 4... you don't need to check any more numbers past that because you already would have found it in those first pairs. Once you hit the square root of the number, you know you don't have to check anymore.
or just divide by the primes
So for example you want to check if 51 is prime, and you know that sqrt(51) is just a bit over 7, you only have to check if 51 is divisible by 2, 3, 5, 7. You don't need to go any further than that.
20/2 wields a quotient with no remainder so it is automatically not prime
Obviously 20 isn't prime, lgba, that was not the point of the example.
i was giving an eample too...of my method
The point was to show why you don't need to worry about primes greater than the square root, because you would already have run into them before you got to the square root.
makes sense...
The square root bound is very useful when you are using computer methods to check primality on large numbers, it saves a lot of time.

Not the answer you are looking for?

Search for more explanations.

Ask your own question