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mahmit2012

Hyperbolic functions and Theory of Relativity.

  • one year ago
  • one year ago

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  1. mahmit2012
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    As some experiences from scientists the light has maximum speed about 3*10^8m/s even though if two lights move against to each other

    • one year ago
  2. mahmit2012
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    |dw:1338767458787:dw|

    • one year ago
  3. mahmit2012
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    |dw:1338767523339:dw|

    • one year ago
  4. Chlorophyll
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    Collision?

    • one year ago
  5. mahmit2012
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    no not collision but not different you can suppose that they strike together .

    • one year ago
  6. mahmit2012
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    But important problem is that why the relativity speed not 2C and it is just C !!

    • one year ago
  7. mahmit2012
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    Did you get it? compare lights with other movement.

    • one year ago
  8. Chlorophyll
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    That's where I'm puzzle ?!?

    • one year ago
  9. mahmit2012
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    moving

    • one year ago
  10. mahmit2012
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    Einstein was a first to solve this problem with his theory is called Theory of Relativity

    • one year ago
  11. Chlorophyll
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    He's well known by it !

    • one year ago
  12. mahmit2012
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    And he shows that light move in the own coordinate.

    • one year ago
  13. mahmit2012
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    |dw:1338768308222:dw|

    • one year ago
  14. mahmit2012
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    |dw:1338768367243:dw|

    • one year ago
  15. Chlorophyll
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    Talk about rotation, I'm not a fan of rotation of axis :(

    • one year ago
  16. mahmit2012
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    the rotation formula in above does not work for light!!!

    • one year ago
  17. mahmit2012
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    |dw:1338768505376:dw|

    • one year ago
  18. mahmit2012
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    |dw:1338768588960:dw|

    • one year ago
  19. Chlorophyll
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    Oh, I see!

    • one year ago
  20. mahmit2012
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    I showed that two rotation of unique vectors (1,0) and (0,1)

    • one year ago
  21. mahmit2012
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    |dw:1338768774136:dw|

    • one year ago
  22. mahmit2012
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    |dw:1338768856281:dw|

    • one year ago
  23. mahmit2012
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    but light does not obey from this reality !!

    • one year ago
  24. mahmit2012
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    do you know anything about hyperbolic function? Coshx SinhX

    • one year ago
  25. mahmit2012
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    |dw:1338769106783:dw|

    • one year ago
  26. mahmit2012
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    |dw:1338769145066:dw|

    • one year ago
  27. mahmit2012
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    |dw:1338769201119:dw|

    • one year ago
  28. Chlorophyll
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    Honestly, the formula you showing here is what I've read from the book, that's all !!!

    • one year ago
  29. mahmit2012
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    finally light rotation formula has hyperbolic functions instead trigonometric

    • one year ago
  30. mahmit2012
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    |dw:1338769358909:dw|

    • one year ago
  31. mahmit2012
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    it makes some new concepts for light you can never believe those but they are all correct

    • one year ago
  32. Chlorophyll
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    Because hyperbolic involving with omega element!

    • one year ago
  33. mahmit2012
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    no because hyperbolic functions have no limited range like sinx ,cosx

    • one year ago
  34. mahmit2012
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    |dw:1338769575369:dw|

    • one year ago
  35. Chlorophyll
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    That's new concept to my understanding =)

    • one year ago
  36. mahmit2012
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    |dw:1338769611999:dw|

    • one year ago
  37. Chlorophyll
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    Yep, taking notes now!

    • one year ago
  38. Chlorophyll
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    Do you mind solving a problem about find the parabola rotation?

    • one year ago
  39. Chlorophyll
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    *finding

    • one year ago
  40. Chlorophyll
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    x² - 3xy + 4y² +2x - y + 5 = 0

    • one year ago
  41. Chlorophyll
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    How do I eliminate the term xy to recognize its type of graph?

    • one year ago
  42. mahmit2012
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    I have an own way for this problem. it is so easy and cover whole of them.

    • one year ago
  43. Chlorophyll
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    I'm trying to work on the axis rotation formula, but just half way :(

    • one year ago
  44. Chlorophyll
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    we can't rely on the coefficient of x² and y²?

    • one year ago
  45. Chlorophyll
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    :)

    • one year ago
  46. Jemurray3
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    This is literally the most confusing thread I've ever read. The answer the initial question is that in relativity, velocities don't add like that. The relativistic velocity addition law is \[v_{rel} = \frac{v_1+v_2}{1+\frac{v_1 \cdot v_2}{c^2}} \] at small velocities, this is approximately \[v_{rel} \approx v_1 + v_2\] which is what we use in everyday life.

    • one year ago
  47. mahmit2012
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    ok and if v1=v2=c then vr=(c+c)/2=c so I just want to show that why.

    • one year ago
  48. mahmit2012
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    Ok.for prepare i am going to answer your last question.

    • one year ago
  49. Chlorophyll
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    I'm on it!

    • one year ago
  50. Chlorophyll
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    y' = x sinh (theta) + y cosh (theta)

    • one year ago
  51. Jemurray3
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    That conclusion seems to have been drawn COMPLETELY out of thin air. Your rationale appears to have something to do with spatial rotations and hyperbolic functions which by some wayward tangent could I suppose be related to Lorentz boosts and rotations and the addition of rapidity rather than classical velocity but it is only through the most indirect channels that I could draw that conclusion, and if I knew nothing of relativity this would be meaningless!

    • one year ago
  52. Jemurray3
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    I already know relativity. I'm just making the point that unless somebody was already well versed in relativity beyond the undergraduate level this would be completely meaningless, and even if they were this would only indirectly and momentarily flirt with coherence.

    • one year ago
  53. mahmit2012
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    if you would like to know how the Laurence formula are made from hyperbolic functions go and watch a lecture in Stanford modern physic in youtube in this site: http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=BAurgxtOdxY

    • one year ago
  54. Limitless
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    Like @Jemurray3, I am completely unsure where this thread is going and almost uncertain where it began. As such, Je has acquired the best answer from me.

    • one year ago
  55. mahmit2012
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    It began just for a individual person as an introduction not an academic lecture so I offered to jemurray3 a site for that.

    • one year ago
  56. Jemurray3
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    If somebody asked you to explain basic mechanics to them, would you start ranting about Lagrangians and chaotic dynamics in phase space, or would you talk about bouncing basketballs and blocks on inclines?

    • one year ago
  57. mahmit2012
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    I found out this way for a person who know rotation is better.so if you have any suggestion I would like to hear from you.

    • one year ago
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