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alexalva93

What is meant by the phrase, “conservation of mass

  • one year ago
  • one year ago

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  1. Kryten
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    oh cmon google it is a bit vast topic

    • one year ago
  2. Kryten
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    http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Conservation_of_mass

    • one year ago
  3. Kryten
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    do you people even poses any book from any subject from school?

    • one year ago
  4. alexalva93
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    No is all online.

    • one year ago
  5. Kryten
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    well god bless google then!!! :)

    • one year ago
  6. Miss_Deva
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    @Kryten Lol, I think all of humanity would be lost without it. :P

    • one year ago
  7. Carl_Pham
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    Makes you wonder how we oldsters got an education at all, huh? I graduated from MIT in 1984. Top-notch technical college, right? But no Internet, and I was one of the very few of my classmates to ever touch a computer, because I happened to know people working on the Multics system (big iron -- filled a room). They gave us problem sets on paper, and we sat in our rooms with our textbooks and TI-30 calculator (which will actually do square roots and logs!) and wrote them out on paper with a pencil and a large supply of erasers. Research was done in the library, of course. The student center library was open 24 hours a day, and had copies of every textbook and assigned reference. The coffeeshop would sell you powerful caffeine doses all night, and did a brisk business during finals week. It was as busy at 4 AM as most places are at noon. Graphs? On paper, with a ruler. You could do log or semilog plots if you bought the right paper. No spreadsheets. Curve-fitting? A calculator and a good supply of scratch paper. Lab reports? In a lab notebook with carbon between the pages. Papers? On the typewriter, and the best accessory to have or borrow was correction tape, so you could fix a mistyping easily, although if you typed more than a few letters wrong you might as well just type the whole page over again. No online discussion groups, of course. No e-mail. No cell phones. If you need help, you could wander down the hall of your living group to look for a friend doing the same problem set, or you could've arranged to meet up beforehand to work together. If you wanted to cry to your girlfriend back home, or at another college....well, in principle you could telephone, but long distance was right expensive, the kind of thing you could afford once or twice a month. Your normal recourse would be to write a letter. People actually did write tear-stained letters and wait two weeks to find out the response. A different world, no? On the other hand, it was a lot cheaper: my total expenses for my first year were about $5,000, and I was able to pay a fair amount of it myself, earning $2.98/hour re-shelving books in the library. I got to know the people I lived with very well, because for our entertainment we talked, chugged beer, told jokes, went out to the movies, took walks, rented boats and sailed, or shot the sh*t sitting around the living room for hours. There was no computer screen on your desk into which you could disappear. No e-mail or text messages to check, no WoW or other online game into which to be absorbed -- not even Nintendo, Xbox, or any other video game to take up someone's solitary attention. (Video games, e.g. Tank War or Tetris, were the size of refrigerators and lived in arcades. You fed them quarters.) We had a lot of parties, did a lot of dancing, went to visit and hang out over coffee (during the day) or beer (at night and on weekends). We probably had a lot more privacy. I heard from my mom and pop by mail about every four to six weeks, and wrote back about as often. If I wanted to go somewhere privately, nobody would really know, because it was normal for most people to not know where you were and have no way of reaching you for most of the day. Can't call or text the cell phone to find you! We probably talked to strangers more. You had often to ask for directions. If you were stuck somewhere, waiting for a bus or standing in line, there was nothing else to do. Men and women probably flirted more, because there was no online dating, and you never knew who you might meet in some odd chance way.

    • one year ago
  8. alexalva93
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    Life was great back then.

    • one year ago
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