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what is the moral of the story Romeo and Juliet, in your opinion?

Literature
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it depends on your point of veiw on the story. If you think that what Romeo and Juliet did was wrong it could be that don't believe in young love, listen to your parents, don't behave on impulsive behavior, etc. On the other hand if you believe what they did was right then it could be follow your heart, don't be afraid of whats to come, don't follow others prejudices, love conquers all, etc. So yeah just depends on your own opinion of the story.
Romeo and Juliet is a play, not a sermon or one of Aesop's fables. Shakespeare did not intend for it to have a "moral", it was written to only entertain, but if there was an attended moral then I would say that feuding won't get you anywhere, it will only lead to turmoil.
R&J is a typical tragedy in that it has a tragic hero. It has been argued that there are two, but really the play centers around Romeo more than Juliet, but that is splitting hairs. I'd argue that Shakespeare doesn't always have a moral, but his plays often hold up a mirror to society to reflect back our strengths and flaws. That constitutes more of a theme than an moral. A moral in a story would suggest a moral imperative - do this or don't do that. In this particular play though, there are a lot of things that point to R&J focusing on our rash decisions. As you reread the play, there are so many impetuous decisions that brought down both houses. Romeo's swift move away from Rosaline to Juliet. Tybalt's anger towards Romeo. There rash and quick marriage. The Friar's poorly considered scheme to have them married to end the feud. The rash decision to play dead. Juliet's father's unwillingness to consider her feelings in the marriage, even the feud itself. The list goes on and on, but ultimately all the wrongs in the play could have been averted with a small bit of thoughtfulness. I would agree that you should take away from the play what you saw, but one of the major themes is certainly a sense of the rash and often childish behavior we often exhibit.

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