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PLEASE HELP!!! Could a thermometer be used to measure the pressure inside a helium-filled weather balloon?

Chemistry
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why not?!
Well, that's what I was thinking, but would it be more reasonable to measure it with a barometer?
well yes, but you can also use thermometer...

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Other answers:

Which do you think would be the best?
Barometer or thermometer?
well barometer would be better of course...
What I'm wondering, though, is how would you get a balloon over the top of a barometer? Isn't a barometer supposed to be inverted, so that the liquid mercury pushes up into the tube?
barometers if i remember correct are filled with some liquids and are compleatly full
The barometer looks like this |dw:1339117085144:dw| The inverted tube contains a space of vacuum which will be filled if the outside pressure is high. Atmospheric pressure pushes the mercury down as shown in arrow , them it pushes up the tube. The mercury goes up because that's the place which requires less force to be occupied because its vacuum. If the atmospheric pressure is high, the mercury column will be long, and vice versa.
Okay, I do understand that, but what do you think of measuring the pressure inside the balloon with a barometer? Do you think that sounds reasonable, or do you think it would be better with a thermometer?
yes sorry i meant membrane manometer...
I don't think you can measure the pressure inside the balloon because it depends on the elasticity of the rubber.
Yes, I agree, as well. Don't worry - I'm not actually going to try this - this is one of the questions from my chemistry course.
@.Sam. - which do you think would be reasonable - measuring the pressure with a thermometer or a barometer? I guess we'll have to "think outside the box," for this question.
oh its a helium filled balloon, helium is the most ideal gas in the periodic table, you could use PV=nRT to calculate pressure , which means that you can use a thermometer to find the change in temperature
Aha! That's exactly what I thought! But, just in case the barometer is the right answer, is there any way that you could measure the pressure inside the balloon, with a barometer?
no others unless you put the barometer inside the balloon
Great! - that's exactly my thinking! Thank you very much - you've been so helpful! =) I really do appreciate it!

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