Quantcast

Got Homework?

Connect with other students for help. It's a free community.

  • across
    MIT Grad Student
    Online now
  • laura*
    Helped 1,000 students
    Online now
  • Hero
    College Math Guru
    Online now

Here's the question you clicked on:

55 members online
  • 0 replying
  • 0 viewing

.Sam. Group Title

Weird phenomenon

  • 2 years ago
  • 2 years ago

  • This Question is Closed
  1. .Sam. Group Title
    Best Response
    You've already chosen the best response.
    Medals 1

    I was wondering, "if" you are the size of human, and you see an ant moving very quickly, and you are about to smash the ant using your hand. From the ant's view, Is it true that the ant look at your hand is slower? Another example , Let say you are human sized, a very tall skyscraper is falling and you are watching it fall, the skyscraper falls very slowly right? And let say you use a toy skyscraper and make it fall, it falls very quickly. My conclusion is when an object is larger than 'us' (planets), we view the planets "ages" slower than us (maybe because of the size or the mass difference), likewise, let's say you're the size of a planet, you will observe the humans in earth were like 'fast-foward' Note: In my opinion, When the mass of an object is larger or bigger, you slows down your "own" time. But this is just my suggestion and I know that time can't be slowed down, but when comparing with different object sizes or masses, maybe it will.

    • 2 years ago
  2. ujjwal Group Title
    Best Response
    You've already chosen the best response.
    Medals 0

    I totally disagree. speed is never dependent on time.|dw:1339229314104:dw| In the given diagram, both bodies will accelerate equally under the action of gravity irrespective of their masses. they will have same instantaneous velocities which will be independent of their masses.

    • 2 years ago
  3. ujjwal Group Title
    Best Response
    You've already chosen the best response.
    Medals 0

    oops! i meant speed is not dependent on mass.

    • 2 years ago
  4. Vincent-Lyon.Fr Group Title
    Best Response
    You've already chosen the best response.
    Medals 0

    It can be dependent on how mass is distributed. Imagine two uniform rods, one long and one short. They are kept upright on a surface and released. If there is enough friction, they will rotate about their points of contact with the surface. The shorter one will fall faster than the longer one.

    • 2 years ago
  5. .Sam. Group Title
    Best Response
    You've already chosen the best response.
    Medals 1

    @ujjwal But what about example 2?

    • 2 years ago
  6. ujjwal Group Title
    Best Response
    You've already chosen the best response.
    Medals 0

    It would be wrong to say speed is dependent on mass. we don't have any such relation between mass and speed. Both tall as well as small sky scraper will fall at the same rate (or accelerate at same rate, since they will be acted upon by gravity) . Its just that the taller skyscraper will take more time to reach ground since it has to cover more distance to reach the surface ( or ground).

    • 2 years ago
  7. .Sam. Group Title
    Best Response
    You've already chosen the best response.
    Medals 1

    Based on Einstein's special and general theories of relativity,he state that, relative to a given observer, time passes more slowly for bodies moving quickly relative to that observer,if we compare planets and us, the planets move relatively faster than us, the planet's clock could be slowed down.

    • 2 years ago
  8. UnkleRhaukus Group Title
    Best Response
    You've already chosen the best response.
    Medals 0

    the hand will appear to move faster than the ant can comprehend the hand will see the ant move in "slow motion"

    • 2 years ago
  9. goutham1995 Group Title
    Best Response
    You've already chosen the best response.
    Medals 0

    this is true..larger masses slows down time around it

    • 2 years ago
  10. ujjwal Group Title
    Best Response
    You've already chosen the best response.
    Medals 0

    @goutham1995 but is it observable in case of skyscrapers?

    • 2 years ago
  11. CliffSedge Group Title
    Best Response
    You've already chosen the best response.
    Medals 0

    It's more a psychological feature of perspective than any different laws of physics.

    • 2 years ago
  12. CliffSedge Group Title
    Best Response
    You've already chosen the best response.
    Medals 0

    I'm not an expert on the perceptions of insects in your smashing-the-ant example, but I imagine that for creatures with faster transmission of neural signals, external events appear slower by comparison. If you've ever experienced the sensation of time slowing down when you in a very excited state, you'll know what I mean. I believe the effect is called "lentation." [n.b. looking up "lentation" on the Internet will pull up a lot of wacky voodoo stuff, so perhaps use the more scientific, "tachypyschia."]

    • 2 years ago
  13. goutham1995 Group Title
    Best Response
    You've already chosen the best response.
    Medals 0

    @ujjwal - i guess so..it works with pyramids in egypt...

    • 2 years ago
  14. Mani_Jha Group Title
    Best Response
    You've already chosen the best response.
    Medals 0

    I think larger objects tend to 'apparently' fall slower because, having a large surface area, they experience more air resistance. In the real world, acceleration of a falling body will be: a=g-a' a' is the retardation due to air resistance. For the same reason, a larger object will tend to fall slower than a very small pebble. I don't think time can be slowed down without achieving the speed of light.

    • 2 years ago
    • Attachments:

See more questions >>>

Your question is ready. Sign up for free to start getting answers.

spraguer (Moderator)
5 → View Detailed Profile

is replying to Can someone tell me what button the professor is hitting...

23

  • Teamwork 19 Teammate
  • Problem Solving 19 Hero
  • You have blocked this person.
  • ✔ You're a fan Checking fan status...

Thanks for being so helpful in mathematics. If you are getting quality help, make sure you spread the word about OpenStudy.

This is the testimonial you wrote.
You haven't written a testimonial for Owlfred.