LifeIsADangerousGame
  • LifeIsADangerousGame
I love this one, it's so imaginative :D @badreferences
Writing
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At vero eos et accusamus et iusto odio dignissimos ducimus qui blanditiis praesentium voluptatum deleniti atque corrupti quos dolores et quas molestias excepturi sint occaecati cupiditate non provident, similique sunt in culpa qui officia deserunt mollitia animi, id est laborum et dolorum fuga. Et harum quidem rerum facilis est et expedita distinctio. Nam libero tempore, cum soluta nobis est eligendi optio cumque nihil impedit quo minus id quod maxime placeat facere possimus, omnis voluptas assumenda est, omnis dolor repellendus. Itaque earum rerum hic tenetur a sapiente delectus, ut aut reiciendis voluptatibus maiores alias consequatur aut perferendis doloribus asperiores repellat.
schrodinger
  • schrodinger
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LifeIsADangerousGame
  • LifeIsADangerousGame
Will there really be a "Morning"? By Emily wingspaninson Will there really be a "Morning"? Is there such a thing as "Day"? Could I see it from the mountains If I were as tall as they? Has it feet like Water lilies? Has it feathers like a Bird? Is it brought from famous countries Of which I have never heard? Oh some Scholar! Oh some Sailor! Oh some Wise Men from the skies! Please to tell a little Pilgrim Where the place called "Morning" lies!
LifeIsADangerousGame
  • LifeIsADangerousGame
Emily wingspaninson*
LifeIsADangerousGame
  • LifeIsADangerousGame
Oh. It thinks I'm cursing! :P Well You can search for the author :P

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anonymous
  • anonymous
I can guess who it is, haha. Need to go get dinner though, so give me some time to read and digest poem. It's not as fast as math. XD
LifeIsADangerousGame
  • LifeIsADangerousGame
:P right!
anonymous
  • anonymous
Alright, from the get go I have two impressions of this poem. The first is that it's just humor. I doubt this, knowing Emily D.'s writing style, but it's the most parsimonious explanation. She talks about morning, but defies expectations by treating it as some exotic and spiritual commodity, as opposed to a common one experienced by people around the world. So, literal humor. The second impression, and the one I'm more certain of, is that the poem describes the journey of someone searching for something that can be symbolically represented by "morning", "day", and "sun". I assert that this thing is probably happiness. Notably she begins by saying that she is searching for morning/day. Then she asks that if she were as tall as mountains, whether or not she'd be tall enough to see morning/day. By comparing herself to natural giants (mountains), she sets an expectation--and the result of this expectation is that she can grasp happiness (will she see the morning if she was tall enough?). Thereon two similes--water lilies and birds--enforces how happiness is a natural commodity. Also, given the spiritual relevance of the two; it's quite possibly about how happiness is spiritual in nature. The rarity/exotic-ness of happiness is enforced by the line about "countries... I've never heard". And then begging wise men and explorers--people who know a lot about life--to inform this "pilgrim"--the narrator who wishes to find happiness--to share their secrets about how to find this morning/happiness. So, yeah, either the entire thing is a joke, which is technically more likely--or, as I think, it's about someone trying to find happiness. If there's more depth, I'm missing it.
LifeIsADangerousGame
  • LifeIsADangerousGame
Nice, you have an eye for writing :D Wouldn't have caught all that...I just would've been like...it's funny, she's pretending that morning is a place to go to, it's very funny... :P
LifeIsADangerousGame
  • LifeIsADangerousGame
What's your favorite type of poetry?
anonymous
  • anonymous
Haikus. I think "brevity is the soul of wit" is about as true as it gets. Also, I find them funny.
LifeIsADangerousGame
  • LifeIsADangerousGame
Ooh, I find those super complicated :P I like free verse with a darkness to them...
anonymous
  • anonymous
Edgar Allan Poe? You might like him. :P My favorite (fiction) writer of all time is George Orwell. His concision and handle on language is amazing.
LifeIsADangerousGame
  • LifeIsADangerousGame
Love him! Sort of, some of his stuff...is a little too much, but I love most of his work. I like his story "The Tell-Tale Heart" that was epic!
anonymous
  • anonymous
Ha. I have a love-hate with him. He has so many great "one-liners", so to speak, but his language is so flowery and slow that I get lost in everything he's trying to tell me.
LifeIsADangerousGame
  • LifeIsADangerousGame
I just enjoy dark themes, don't really care for the meaning. I personally hated the first one, Do Not Go Gently Into That Good Night by Thomas. It was, no offense to him or anyone else, lame and stupid. He didn't use enough description and I barely got his point. I found it annoying and banned him from ever entering my favorite writers list.
LifeIsADangerousGame
  • LifeIsADangerousGame
Of course, a lot of people would beg to differ, but I stick to my opinion.
LifeIsADangerousGame
  • LifeIsADangerousGame
I like it when you're kept guessing and then at the end they explain what them mean in a few simple words. THAT is pure poetry! Of course, there are some poems I'm at peace with, don't mind them, and don't hate them either. Like this one: I Want Out by Charlie (it's a girl) Daley I want OUT! From this battered and bruised body. I want OUT! From this cruel, malicious world. I want OUT! From the pain and hurt, other humans cause I want OUT! From the gory sights, I must endure. But no, I am refused of this opportunity My plea to escape to paradise is rejected without a second glance. I wait. And wait. And wait. As my torment wears me down over and over. Then. I get a single glance. A glance of that bright light. And then its gone. My hope falters and dies. I lift my eyes to the sky and plea once more. But there is no refuge coming for me. I didn't really understand it very much and I don't think Charlie did well, but I've never heard of her so maybe she's just starting
anonymous
  • anonymous
Describing depression? "I want out" of "this cruel, malicious world"; of "pain and hurt"; of "gory sights"; of "this battered... body". And then, "my plea to escape is rejected". Here I assume is how you can tell it's specifically about depression and not suicide, because it's kind of hard to be rejected if you try to commit suicide. It discusses "waiting". I suppose this is the corollary to the lethargy one feels while depressed? The "single glance bit" seems really self-explanitory. Hope. Once. Gone. And it ends on a sad note. What a terribly straightforward poem. I'm certain I'm missing something, but I really don't want to read it anymore. It's so cliched that even Ayn Rand seems better.
LifeIsADangerousGame
  • LifeIsADangerousGame
That's the word I was looking for! Cliche! It was disgustingly cliche, I don't hate it, but I wouldn't read it unless you paid me.
anonymous
  • anonymous
In its defense, it wasn't badly written. It's just uninspired.
LifeIsADangerousGame
  • LifeIsADangerousGame
Well yes, sort of like the author felt like writing poetry and decided to choose an easy(unless imaginative and well written) topic and without inspiration, didn't achieve the inspired feeling to it

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