Quantcast

Got Homework?

Connect with other students for help. It's a free community.

  • across
    MIT Grad Student
    Online now
  • laura*
    Helped 1,000 students
    Online now
  • Hero
    College Math Guru
    Online now

Here's the question you clicked on:

55 members online
  • 0 replying
  • 0 viewing

moongazer Group Title

How to be good in Chemistry ? Do you have some tips? :)

  • 2 years ago
  • 2 years ago

  • This Question is Closed
  1. jhonyy9 Group Title
    Best Response
    You've already chosen the best response.
    Medals 0

    just you need understanding ALL processes and theory ,for example - so my opinion good luck bye

    • 2 years ago
  2. Natshane Group Title
    Best Response
    You've already chosen the best response.
    Medals 0

    I agree with @jhonny9, if you understand the theory, everything works out. And remember, basically all calculations are derived from these basic formula. |dw:1339423389890:dw| oops, sorry at the bottom of the moles is volume. This is the basic equations for chemistry. (excluding heat etc)

    • 2 years ago
  3. henrykhor94 Group Title
    Best Response
    You've already chosen the best response.
    Medals 0

    understanding concepts are the most important. Memorising completely is not a solution.

    • 2 years ago
  4. Carl_Pham Group Title
    Best Response
    You've already chosen the best response.
    Medals 3

    A great deal of chemistry simply requires memorization. This should not come as a surpirse: chemistry is a load of concepts build on top of a great big pile of observations and facts. If you are not familiar with the facts -- if they are not at your fingertips -- the concepts and theories won't make enough sense to become second nature. So I disagree somewhat with the Zeitgeist: you DO need to memorize quite a lot of things to become good at chemistry. ON TOP of that, you need to become familiar with the ideas and methods that will make sense of your memorized facts. Do not neglect either. And how do you become good at both? The same way you'd become good at baseball, or baseball trivia: practice, practice, practice. Do every problem in the back of the chapter. Do problems from other books. Do problems your teacher recommends, and more besides. Make some up yourself. And: make use of the fact that the single strongest learning experience is taking a test. (You can look this up in the professional literature on education, if you like. There was even a NYT story on it some time ago.) Taking a test is a much better learning experience -- will solidify your