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srev98

  • 3 years ago

will the gravity decrease with increasing heights?

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  1. AravindG
    • 3 years ago
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    yep definitely !!!

  2. AravindG
    • 3 years ago
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    there is even a formula for it !

  3. srev98
    • 3 years ago
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    may i know the formula for that?

  4. maheshmeghwal9
    • 3 years ago
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    yep u must have right to ask that\[\LARGE{\color{red}{F=\frac{Gm1m2}{R^2}}}\] If u increase the distance{R}, force will definitely decrease & so the gravity would also decrease.

  5. maheshmeghwal9
    • 3 years ago
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    m1 & m2 are mass of any 2 bodies. r is distance between them. G is gravitational constant.

  6. srev98
    • 3 years ago
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    thanx friend

  7. AravindG
    • 3 years ago
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    wikpedia explains it nicely http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Gravity_of_Earth

  8. AravindG
    • 3 years ago
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    look under altitude

  9. AravindG
    • 3 years ago
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    thats the formula

  10. maheshmeghwal9
    • 3 years ago
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    \[\color{green}{G=6.67\times10^-11 units.}\]

  11. maheshmeghwal9
    • 3 years ago
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    & good one according to @AravindG . \[\huge{\color{Purple}{g_h=g_0\left(\frac{r_e}{r_e+h}\right)^2.}}\]Where; 1.) "gh" is the gravitational acceleration at height "h", above sea level. 2.) "re" is the Earth's mean radius. 3.) "g0" is the standard gravitational acceleration.

  12. maheshmeghwal9
    • 3 years ago
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    This one is also used for proving ur question:)\[\LARGE{\color{red}{F=\frac{GM_1M_2}{R^2}.}}\]Where; 1.) M1 & M2 are masses of 2 bodies. 2.) G is Gravitational constant. 3.) R is distance between those two bodies. 4.) & F is the force felt by them.

  13. maheshmeghwal9
    • 3 years ago
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    \[\color{blue}{\text{Force should be this: -}}\]\[\LARGE{\color{RED}{\overrightarrow F.}}\]

  14. maheshmeghwal9
    • 3 years ago
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    \[\color{green}{\text{Should=Must*.}}\]

  15. polimo711
    • 3 years ago
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    i would not say that gravity decreases with more altitude but yes it would decrease with distance from the mass.

  16. morales89
    • 3 years ago
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    yes

  17. marcw12345
    • 3 years ago
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    yes

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