Quantcast

Got Homework?

Connect with other students for help. It's a free community.

  • across
    MIT Grad Student
    Online now
  • laura*
    Helped 1,000 students
    Online now
  • Hero
    College Math Guru
    Online now

Here's the question you clicked on:

55 members online
  • 0 replying
  • 0 viewing

HairtUB Group Title

What bonds are we breaking when we cut potatoes? This might seem like a stupid question, but if you think of it, we are cutting through something and separating the potato molecules, right? I don't think it's covalent bonds...but I have no idea.

  • 2 years ago
  • 2 years ago

  • This Question is Closed
  1. srev98 Group Title
    Best Response
    You've already chosen the best response.
    Medals 0

    may be the bond between the fat molecules of the potato.

    • 2 years ago
  2. BTaylor Group Title
    Best Response
    You've already chosen the best response.
    Medals 0

    potatoes are mostly starch and water, so it would be covalent bonds of the carbohydrates. @srev98 potatoes don't have much fat content.

    • 2 years ago
  3. srev98 Group Title
    Best Response
    You've already chosen the best response.
    Medals 0

    thanx for correcting me!!!

    • 2 years ago
  4. Carl_Pham Group Title
    Best Response
    You've already chosen the best response.
    Medals 3

    Generally you aren't cutting chemical bonds at all. Keep in mind chemical bonds are extremely strong, and when you truly must cut chemical bonds to divide a sample of a substance -- e.g. when you are cutting diamond or steel -- it takes quite a lot of force, much more than when you are cutting a potato. And keep in mind the bonds in food (e.g. carbon-carbon bonds) aren't any weaker than those in diamond. What you are actually doing is just dividing the sample on a line that runs *between* molecules, so you are working against the much weaker intermolecular forces, in the case of foodstuffs almost entirely London forces, with a little seasoning of H-bonding and "hydrophobic force." On both sides of your cut you would find almost nothing but intact molecules. (You might well cut a bond or two, here or there, just by luck.)

    • 2 years ago
  5. HairtUB Group Title
    Best Response
    You've already chosen the best response.
    Medals 0

    That makes sense, thanks :)

    • 2 years ago
    • Attachments:

See more questions >>>

Your question is ready. Sign up for free to start getting answers.

spraguer (Moderator)
5 → View Detailed Profile

is replying to Can someone tell me what button the professor is hitting...

23

  • Teamwork 19 Teammate
  • Problem Solving 19 Hero
  • You have blocked this person.
  • ✔ You're a fan Checking fan status...

Thanks for being so helpful in mathematics. If you are getting quality help, make sure you spread the word about OpenStudy.

This is the testimonial you wrote.
You haven't written a testimonial for Owlfred.