Quantcast

Got Homework?

Connect with other students for help. It's a free community.

  • across
    MIT Grad Student
    Online now
  • laura*
    Helped 1,000 students
    Online now
  • Hero
    College Math Guru
    Online now

Here's the question you clicked on:

55 members online
  • 0 replying
  • 0 viewing

Rose2730

Your biceps muscle is attached to the top of your humerus and to the end of your radius, near your elbow. What would happen if the biceps were attached to the top and bottom of your humerus instead?

  • one year ago
  • one year ago

  • This Question is Open
  1. Rose2730
    Best Response
    You've already chosen the best response.
    Medals 0

    A. You would be able to pull your forearm toward your shoulder with more force. B. You would not be able to pull your forearm up toward your shoulder. C. Your humerus would lengthen and shorten each time your biceps contracted. D. Your triceps muscle would make your arm bend backward when it contracted.

    • one year ago
  2. Rose2730
    Best Response
    You've already chosen the best response.
    Medals 0

    Hi everyone. I'm doing a Biology worksheet. I ran into this question and I'm a little thrown off by it. I'm thinking it's B...

    • one year ago
  3. maxwellhas
    Best Response
    You've already chosen the best response.
    Medals 0

    B, Your bones are stopping you from letting your arm bend backward. You can't push forward too so that's B.

    • one year ago
  4. agentx5
    Best Response
    You've already chosen the best response.
    Medals 1

    Simple biomechanics logic. It has to be B. The bones aren't changing shape, C is crazy lol. A is irrelevant, as your elbow forms a lever, 3rd class I think. With the effort on the wrong side of the fulcrum and you get nothing happening, just a dangling load.

    • one year ago
  5. maxwellhas
    Best Response
    You've already chosen the best response.
    Medals 0

    yeah! nice Agentx5! High Five!

    • one year ago
  6. agentx5
    Best Response
    You've already chosen the best response.
    Medals 1

    You can make this happen by slashing somebody's tendons that attach this muscle. A disarming technique they used to train samurai to do in Japan during the feudal era. (the modern equivalent of tazing somebody I guess)

    • one year ago
  7. agentx5
    Best Response
    You've already chosen the best response.
    Medals 1

    And that is called more than you wanted to know :P

    • one year ago
  8. maxwellhas
    Best Response
    You've already chosen the best response.
    Medals 0

    yeah, you can do that too by breaking someone's bones!

    • one year ago
  9. maxwellhas
    Best Response
    You've already chosen the best response.
    Medals 0

    Rose must be very happy to see all our contributions!

    • one year ago
  10. agentx5
    Best Response
    You've already chosen the best response.
    Medals 1

    Major structural bones such as the humerus are not as easy to break as you might think. A katana is very sharp.

    • one year ago
  11. maxwellhas
    Best Response
    You've already chosen the best response.
    Medals 0

    yeah, but it's still breakable

    • one year ago
  12. agentx5
    Best Response
    You've already chosen the best response.
    Medals 1

    True. ^_^ I'll not debate that

    • one year ago
  13. maxwellhas
    Best Response
    You've already chosen the best response.
    Medals 0

    :)

    • one year ago
    • Attachments:

See more questions >>>

Your question is ready. Sign up for free to start getting answers.

spraguer (Moderator)
5 → View Detailed Profile

is replying to Can someone tell me what button the professor is hitting...

23

  • Teamwork 19 Teammate
  • Problem Solving 19 Hero
  • You have blocked this person.
  • ✔ You're a fan Checking fan status...

Thanks for being so helpful in mathematics. If you are getting quality help, make sure you spread the word about OpenStudy.

This is the testimonial you wrote.
You haven't written a testimonial for Owlfred.