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joyce153

  • 3 years ago

Explain whether it is always true that a difference between two numbers is smaller than either of the numbers. Give an example to justify your answer.

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  1. cookies
    • 3 years ago
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    hey thechoco ur my fan but i never talk to u how come

  2. thechocoluver445
    • 3 years ago
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    Let's say you want the difference of 12 and 6. 12-6 = 6 Not always 20 and 10? 20-10 = 10 10=10, so not always 4 and 3? 4-3 = 1 In this case, sometimes it is true.

  3. thechocoluver445
    • 3 years ago
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    @cookies because you answered a question well

  4. cookies
    • 3 years ago
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    oh thank you!! :)

  5. thechocoluver445
    • 3 years ago
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    lol, no probs :)

  6. cookies
    • 3 years ago
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    hmmmmm okay!! lol

  7. shandelman
    • 3 years ago
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    The chocoluver is right, but there's an even more dramatic example: 10 - (-20) = 30. In this example, the difference is actually *larger* than both numbers!

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