anonymous
  • anonymous
In Video lecture 05 round about 37' where Pr. Jerison draws the f(x)=tan(x) and f(x)=arctan(x) the two curve crosses where if I plug in real data I can't get the same results, did he lowered the curve to just to illustrate the symmetry along the y=x line or do you have to do some kind of stretch to get the same picture?
OCW Scholar - Single Variable Calculus
  • Stacey Warren - Expert brainly.com
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jamiebookeater
  • jamiebookeater
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anonymous
  • anonymous
both are inverse function.........so they are symmetric to line y=x
anonymous
  • anonymous
Thanks, that bit I get, what I'm not sure about is that does the graph of tanx and arctanx overlap or not.
anonymous
  • anonymous
yes they meet at y=x=1

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anonymous
  • anonymous
So do you know what I could do to get the same graph as in the video where the two curves cross each other?
anonymous
  • anonymous
no, u cant draw that graps....because we are not accurate. But u can roughly sketch it
anonymous
  • anonymous
I have quick graph on my iPhone and the two graphs never cross that's why I'm asking :-)
anonymous
  • anonymous
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anonymous
  • anonymous
Thanks but if you plotted the two graphs with real values of tan(x) and arctan(x) they don't cross at all.
kutulu
  • kutulu
if you watch the recitation video for Session 15, it addresses your question. The profession drew the graph of arctan wrong. Within the single domain of -pi/2 -> pi/2, the only place that tan and arctan cross is at x=0. Arctan should be *below* y=x everywhere else while tan should be *above* y=x everywhere else.
kutulu
  • kutulu
erm. make that The professor* drew the graph...
anonymous
  • anonymous
Thanks a million! I'm using iTunes U to watch the videos and I will, from now, watch the recitations on the web! :-)

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