Here's the question you clicked on:

55 members online
  • 0 replying
  • 0 viewing

izzy777

  • 3 years ago

please helpppp!!! Robin pulls a rope attached to a sled with a force of 50 N. The rope makes an angle of 30° with the ground, as shown below. What force will move the sled vertically upwards? 183.4 N 25 N 43.3 N 100 N

  • This Question is Closed
  1. izzy777
    • 3 years ago
    Best Response
    You've already chosen the best response.
    Medals 0

  2. ganeshie8
    • 3 years ago
    Best Response
    You've already chosen the best response.
    Medals 0

    50/sin 30

  3. izzy777
    • 3 years ago
    Best Response
    You've already chosen the best response.
    Medals 0

    wait i dont get it?

  4. ganeshie8
    • 3 years ago
    Best Response
    You've already chosen the best response.
    Medals 0

    by applying 50N at an angle of 30 degrees, the sled is sliding horizontally, right ?

  5. izzy777
    • 3 years ago
    Best Response
    You've already chosen the best response.
    Medals 0

    yes

  6. ganeshie8
    • 3 years ago
    Best Response
    You've already chosen the best response.
    Medals 0

    so, if we apply the same force vertically, the slide will move up vertically

  7. ganeshie8
    • 3 years ago
    Best Response
    You've already chosen the best response.
    Medals 0

    |dw:1340941337117:dw|

  8. ganeshie8
    • 3 years ago
    Best Response
    You've already chosen the best response.
    Medals 0

    so, we need to calculate the value of "x" for which the vertical component becomes "50"

  9. ganeshie8
    • 3 years ago
    Best Response
    You've already chosen the best response.
    Medals 0

    use trigonometry and find..

  10. izzy777
    • 3 years ago
    Best Response
    You've already chosen the best response.
    Medals 0

    i don't know how to solve it...

  11. izzy777
    • 3 years ago
    Best Response
    You've already chosen the best response.
    Medals 0

    im so confused

  12. ganeshie8
    • 3 years ago
    Best Response
    You've already chosen the best response.
    Medals 0

    see the angle 30 once. can you tell whats the opposite side for that angle ?

  13. izzy777
    • 3 years ago
    Best Response
    You've already chosen the best response.
    Medals 0

    well one of the angles = 90 degrees the other one has to be60

  14. ganeshie8
    • 3 years ago
    Best Response
    You've already chosen the best response.
    Medals 0

    |dw:1340941561296:dw|

  15. ganeshie8
    • 3 years ago
    Best Response
    You've already chosen the best response.
    Medals 0

    \(\huge sin\ 30 = \frac{50}{x}\)

  16. ganeshie8
    • 3 years ago
    Best Response
    You've already chosen the best response.
    Medals 0

    \(\huge x = \frac{50}{sin\ 30} = 100N\)

  17. ganeshie8
    • 3 years ago
    Best Response
    You've already chosen the best response.
    Medals 0

    hope it is clear now... ?

  18. izzy777
    • 3 years ago
    Best Response
    You've already chosen the best response.
    Medals 0

    yes! i think i get it now :) thank you so much can you help me with one more question?

  19. ganeshie8
    • 3 years ago
    Best Response
    You've already chosen the best response.
    Medals 0

    sure..

  20. izzy777
    • 3 years ago
    Best Response
    You've already chosen the best response.
    Medals 0

    A force of 8 N is exerted on a box. The component of this force which acts along the ground has a magnitude of 6.93 N, as shown below. What is the measure of angle x? 40° 50° 60° 30°

  21. izzy777
    • 3 years ago
    Best Response
    You've already chosen the best response.
    Medals 0

  22. ganeshie8
    • 3 years ago
    Best Response
    You've already chosen the best response.
    Medals 0

    use cosine

  23. izzy777
    • 3 years ago
    Best Response
    You've already chosen the best response.
    Medals 0

    ?

  24. ganeshie8
    • 3 years ago
    Best Response
    You've already chosen the best response.
    Medals 0

    cos x = adj/hyp = 6.93/8 x = cos^-1(6.93/8) degrees

  25. Not the answer you are looking for?
    Search for more explanations.

    • Attachments:

Ask your own question

Sign Up
Find more explanations on OpenStudy
Privacy Policy