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agentx5

  • 3 years ago

Eh? How do I combine these two parametrics? x = t\(^2\), y = t\(^9\) y=x\(^{\frac{9}{2}}\) isn't good... t just becomes \(t=\sqrt{x}\) yeah?

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  1. anonymous
    • 3 years ago
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    what is wrong with \[y=\sqrt{x}^9\]?

  2. anonymous
    • 3 years ago
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    oh i see maybe it should be \[y=\pm\sqrt{x}^9\]

  3. mukushla
    • 3 years ago
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    \[t=\pm \sqrt{x}\]

  4. agentx5
    • 3 years ago
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    Let me try and see if the computer gives me the option for a \(\pm\)

  5. agentx5
    • 3 years ago
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    No such thing, is there a way to rewrite it where it doesn't require the \(\pm\) @satellite73 ?

  6. agentx5
    • 3 years ago
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    Ah, got it, square both sides... x\(^2\)=y\(^9\) The picky literal syntax being required here is getting to be aggravating.

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