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cunninnc

  • 3 years ago

find the derivative of y=e^(x ln^x)?

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  1. DHASHNI
    • 3 years ago
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    |dw:1342326166682:dw|

  2. lgbasallote
    • 3 years ago
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    i suggest you take the ln first \[\ln y = \ln e^{x \ln x}\] \[\ln y = x\ln x\] now perform implicit differentiation

  3. DHASHNI
    • 3 years ago
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    |dw:1342326299492:dw|

  4. DHASHNI
    • 3 years ago
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    now|dw:1342326337536:dw|

  5. waterineyes
    • 3 years ago
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    You can do it directly: \[\large \frac{d}{dx}(e^{f(x)}) = e^{f(x)} \times \frac{d}{dx}(f(x))\]

  6. DHASHNI
    • 3 years ago
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    differentiating|dw:1342326361411:dw|

  7. lgbasallote
    • 3 years ago
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    lol shortcuts :p

  8. DHASHNI
    • 3 years ago
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    |dw:1342326394723:dw|

  9. cunninnc
    • 3 years ago
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    dhashni it's kinda hard for me to see your letters

  10. eyust707
    • 3 years ago
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    @cunninnc take a look at waterineyes' post. I think that method will make the most sense to you.

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