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aish_premrenu

  • 2 years ago

Can I use a motor as a generator and derive electricity from it?

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  1. cauchy-euler
    • 2 years ago
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    yeah, but what would you drive motor with?

  2. Shayaan_Mustafa
    • 2 years ago
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    Hi aish_premrenu and cauchy-euler :) How are you friends ? Welcome to Openstudy :D

  3. Shayaan_Mustafa
    • 2 years ago
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    I am an electronic engineer not a mechanical engineer. But I would like to say, you can't do this. Because mostly motors are construct in such a way that they work in one direction. Like a stand fan, if you try to generate the electricity from it, then the armeture coil will get burst coz, you will move motor in opposite direction to the magnet that is in the motor, so it will surely destroy fan's motor. Are you getting this?

  4. Shane_B
    • 2 years ago
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    That's not really true. The simple answer is that you certainly can convert a motor to a generator. However, it's obviously not going to be designed for that type of application and could be damaged, particularly once you put a load on it. Google "convert DC motor to generator" or "convert induction motor to generator" to learn more. The bottom line is that moving a coil of wire through a magnetic field will produce electricity...the method of getting that to happen doesn't really matter.

  5. agentx5
    • 2 years ago
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    @Shane_B is correct! The principle of Faraday's law in electromagnetic induction works both ways! In fact, you can also have a generator turn into a synchronous AC motor if it's not having torque applied to it: Most generators you'll find at power plants have to be cranked up to speed (yes, they do have transmissions to step them up to speed, kind of like your cars do) before being connected to the grid. or what happens is that it will turn almost instantly into a synchronous motor and snap to the grid's speed, which is dangerous! If you shut off the steam to an AC turbine in a power plant it WILL continue to spin at the electric grid's frequency (that's 60 Hz here in the US). But you don't want to do this for long or at all if you can avoid it because it's NOT designed for it and it's going to break stuff. So again, you can do this, but using something for what it wasn't engineered for can be anywhere from mildly risky, to breaking stuff, to creating a lethal hazard. The most likely thing that will happen here is that you'll create electrical shorts, overheating, and/or mechanically break the motor. (that said, I've had my share of blowing things up, accidentally)

  6. aish_premrenu
    • 2 years ago
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    @Shane_B , @agentx5 ... Thanks!

  7. agentx5
    • 2 years ago
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    :-)

  8. aish_premrenu
    • 2 years ago
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    I have one more question

  9. agentx5
    • 2 years ago
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    New question button? :-3

  10. aish_premrenu
    • 2 years ago
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    Have an open question.., so im not able to.. Q: In an AC/ DC generator (The simple one with a rectangular loop between two poles of a magnet), the loop is rotated and current is induced, right? Are we then ignoring the magnetic field due to the current carrried (once it starts flowing) by the other arms of the conductor?

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