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How Do I solve this

Mathematics
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1 Attachment
What do you mean without canceling out?
Can you show how to solve this

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Other answers:

I'm not really sure what that means here? You mean without clearing the denominators?
get the number on one side of the = and the others on the other side so that you can manipulate them directly.
I would first clear the denominators by multiplying both sides by (x-7)
CAn you show me please I tried many times
Multiply the 2 terms on the left by (x-7) And Multiply the 1 term on the right by (x-7)
What do you get after performing this?
No, no........
What @estudier ?
x^2-7x+6x-42=7x-49 right?
\[x^2-7x+6x-42=7x-49 \]
Where does that x^2 come from?
|dw:1342565026387:dw|
Freckles when I timed x(x-7)
What is \[\frac{x}{x-7} \cdot (x-7)=?\] \[6 \cdot (x-7)=?\] \[\frac{7}{x-7} \cdot (x-7)=?\]
This equation is inconsistent.
the first one \[x^2-7x\]
no @waheguru \[\frac{a}{a} , \text{ assuming of course } a \neq 0\]
=1
Why do I feel like I am talking to myself here?
left out the a/a=1 part
So the x's cancel out and it becomes 7x?
\[\frac{x(x-7)}{(x-7)}\]
There is no need to multiply initially that is just a waste of time.
What factor does the bottom and top have in common?
@estudier I know you can cencel out but i wanna try this way
The equation is inconsistent!1111
The top and bottom both have the factor (x-7) in common
Yes
I am not cancelling anything.......
x-7/x-7 = -6 is just nonsense
\[\frac{x \not{(x-7)}}{ \not{(x-7)}}\] Imagine that canceler thingy is over the whole factor (x-7) Couldn't do it in latex so we have the first one x So Now try the other two
You two evidently have nothing better to do.....:-)
@estudier I know what you are saying but I just want to convince him
@estudier Then How do you think we solve this
There is no solution, the equation is not consistent (it is a false equation)
no its not, there is an asnwer !!!!!!
It is like writing 1= 2
Right but we need to show him that...and convince him... If he doesn't understand your way, then there is no hurt in me showing this other way
@estudier is right there is no solution
guys ok thanks
He doesn't want to understand it, that is a different thing.
We will get x=7 but that is a contradiction because x cannot be 7
Doing it the way I was trying to show @waheguru
So therefore no solution
When simplifying add or subtract like things first.....
guys look at this http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=q7_xdLZHN6g the same question appears at about 5 miutes
this is not impossible noting is
@estudier @freckles http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=q7_xdLZHN6g at 5 mins
The equation is inconsistent (I don't care what is on youtube)
Ur right i am so sorry
I just realized Brother I appoloze
Accepted.
I was just confued
@waheguru the way the video is doing it was the exact way I was going to show you
Did you see that she got x=7 but then since we have x-7 on bottom then x cannot be 7 so there is no solution
yea

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