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TransendentialPI

  • 3 years ago

This exercise is in a section about using trig substitution to integrate. I can use trig sub, but I'm just not seeing what initial substitution to use so I can apply trig sub. Can anyone give me a hint? I don't need (don't want) it solve to the end. At least not yet.

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  1. TransendentialPI
    • 3 years ago
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    See attached

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  2. Davidjohn
    • 3 years ago
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    |dw:1342935015183:dw|

  3. Davidjohn
    • 3 years ago
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    woops cos theta/4 = 1/ hypotenuse, not just the hypotenuse

  4. Davidjohn
    • 3 years ago
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    just a guess with what is out there

  5. Davidjohn
    • 3 years ago
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    |dw:1342935652408:dw| actually this looks better

  6. Davidjohn
    • 3 years ago
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    then |dw:1342935809458:dw|

  7. dumbcow
    • 3 years ago
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    hint: use trig identity \[\sec^{2} = 1+\tan^{2}\] Factor out the 16 from radical in denominator \[\sqrt{16+x^{6}} = \sqrt{16}\sqrt{1+\frac{x^{6}}{16}}\] Now make the substitution \[x^{6} = 16\tan^{2}\] hope that helps

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