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Kathatesmath94 Group Title

Angelina has a lawn, ABCD. She has placed a watering hose, BD, as shown below. Part A: Angelina plans to put a fence along the length AD of her lawn. What is the length of the fence required? Part B: Using complete sentences, explain how you arrived at the answer for Part A.

  • 2 years ago
  • 2 years ago

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  1. Kathatesmath94 Group Title
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    • 2 years ago
  2. Hero Group Title
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    Hi Katlovesmath94

    • 2 years ago
  3. Kathatesmath94 Group Title
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    hahah hey :)

    • 2 years ago
  4. Hero Group Title
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    I'll let outkast explain since he is so eager

    • 2 years ago
  5. Kathatesmath94 Group Title
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    can you help me with this? I am not sure where to start and I am suppose to explain it

    • 2 years ago
  6. Kathatesmath94 Group Title
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    ok thanks

    • 2 years ago
  7. mbradar2 Group Title
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    For the triangle BCD you are given two of the sides and you can use Pythagorean's theorem to find the third side, the length of side BD. Once you have that, side BD and the 60-degree angle given can be used in a trig function (sine, cosine, or tangent -- which one?) to find out the length of side AD.

    • 2 years ago
  8. Kathatesmath94 Group Title
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    soooo I am still confused what am I doing?

    • 2 years ago
  9. mbradar2 Group Title
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    Step one: look at the triangle BCD. You are given two sides, correct? Let's find the third side, BD. How do we find the third side of a right triangle? Using Pythagorean's theorem. Are you familiar with Pythagorean's theorem? a^2 + b^2 = c^2 ?

    • 2 years ago
  10. Kathatesmath94 Group Title
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    yes

    • 2 years ago
  11. Kathatesmath94 Group Title
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    what am I putting in the pathagoreum therum formula

    • 2 years ago
  12. mbradar2 Group Title
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    |dw:1343004042674:dw|

    • 2 years ago
  13. Hero Group Title
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    Looks like a good explanation going on here so far.

    • 2 years ago
  14. mbradar2 Group Title
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    There are 3 sides in a triangle. You are given two of them: 35 ft and 12 ft. Pythagorean's theorem \[a ^{2}+b ^{2}=c ^{2}\] means you can take those two sides you already know and plug them into "a" and "b" then solve for "c." Try it out. What do you get?

    • 2 years ago
  15. mbradar2 Group Title
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    "c" here is just a generic variable, like x. In your picture, "c" represents the side BD of the triangle. So if you solve for c, you've solved for the length of side BD.

    • 2 years ago
  16. mbradar2 Group Title
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    Do you got it? Or are you still confused on how to use the theorem to get the length of side BD?

    • 2 years ago
  17. Kathatesmath94 Group Title
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    no I am still lost not gonna lie I have been working on this for twenty minutes and I am not sure what I am doing

    • 2 years ago
  18. Kathatesmath94 Group Title
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    like I tried the pathegorium thing and I got some rediculas numbers in the thousands

    • 2 years ago
  19. Kathatesmath94 Group Title
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    I am just frustrated with this problem

    • 2 years ago
  20. J.L. Group Title
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    When you got the large numbers had you already taken the square root of the number?

    • 2 years ago
  21. Kathatesmath94 Group Title
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    no i just did the pathagorium thing squared them and then what i have two huge number equal to c^2

    • 2 years ago
  22. Romero Group Title
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    what are you plugging in for Pythagoras theorem?

    • 2 years ago
  23. Kathatesmath94 Group Title
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    the 35 and 12

    • 2 years ago
  24. Romero Group Title
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    alright that's good. You are doing the right thing. \[12^2+35^2=c^2\]\[144+1225=c^2\]\[1369=c^2\]

    • 2 years ago
  25. Romero Group Title
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    now square root both sides....what do you get then?

    • 2 years ago
  26. Kathatesmath94 Group Title
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    37?

    • 2 years ago
  27. mbradar2 Group Title
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    Good job! So c = 37 means the length of side BD in your picture is 37 feet.

    • 2 years ago
  28. mbradar2 Group Title
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    We are done with triangle BCD. Now look at the next triangle, ABD.

    • 2 years ago
  29. mbradar2 Group Title
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    You are given one angle and one side. We can use a trig function to solve for side AD, which is what you need.

    • 2 years ago
  30. Kathatesmath94 Group Title
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    tan60

    • 2 years ago
  31. mbradar2 Group Title
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    Perfect. Do you know the trick to remember the trig functions, SOH CAH TOA? SOH: sin(angle)=opposite/hypotenuse CAH: cos(angle)=adjacent/hypotenuse TOA: tan(angle)=opposite/adjacent.

    • 2 years ago
  32. Kathatesmath94 Group Title
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    yes

    • 2 years ago
  33. mbradar2 Group Title
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    So tan(60)=opposite/adjacent. What is the side that is opposite of the 60-degree angle? It's the side BD, which you just found out is 37 feet. And what is the side adjacent (or next to) the 60-degree angle? That's the one you're solving for, side AD. So tan(60)=opposite/adjacent=60/AD tan(60)=60/AD Solve for AD. Do you know how to do that?

    • 2 years ago
  34. Kathatesmath94 Group Title
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    opposite is 35 but what is the adjacent? 37?

    • 2 years ago
  35. Kathatesmath94 Group Title
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    oh you multiply AD to both sides

    • 2 years ago
  36. mbradar2 Group Title
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    The 35 is not the opposite side; that's the OTHER triangle; we aren't looking at that triangle at all anymore. We are looking for the opposite side of this small triangle ABD. The opposite of the 60-degree angle in that small triangle is the length BD. BD = 37 feet according to your calculation.

    • 2 years ago
  37. mbradar2 Group Title
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    OH my bad, I mean tan(60)=37/AD

    • 2 years ago
  38. Kathatesmath94 Group Title
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    you still multiply AD to both sides right

    • 2 years ago
  39. mbradar2 Group Title
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    tan(60) = opposite/adjacent = 37 / AD

    • 2 years ago
  40. mbradar2 Group Title
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    Yes.

    • 2 years ago
  41. mbradar2 Group Title
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    So multiplying both sides by AD gives you (AD) tan(60) = 37. Then divide each side by tan(6), so you get AD = 37 / tan(60)

    • 2 years ago
  42. mbradar2 Group Title
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    You should get something in the 20s for your answer for AD if you calculate the tan(60).

    • 2 years ago
  43. mbradar2 Group Title
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    Does it make sense?

    • 2 years ago
  44. Kathatesmath94 Group Title
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    21.361

    • 2 years ago
  45. mbradar2 Group Title
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    Perfect. Good job :)

    • 2 years ago
  46. mbradar2 Group Title
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    If you practice problems like this over and over they get easier.

    • 2 years ago
  47. mbradar2 Group Title
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    Sorry about a couple of my typos there.

    • 2 years ago
  48. Kathatesmath94 Group Title
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    thank goodness that is over lol sorry I was just frustrated I didnt understand how the big number in the pathagorium therum was working

    • 2 years ago
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