Quantcast

A community for students. Sign up today!

Here's the question you clicked on:

55 members online
  • 0 replying
  • 0 viewing

rebeccaskell94

  • 2 years ago

n the figure below, the length of line segment CB is 58 units and the length of line segment BG is 120 units. What is the length of line segment GE? http://learn.flvs.net/webdav/assessment_images/educator_geometry_v14/pool_Geom_3641_0404_07/image0084e2ee688.gif 62√3 116 58√2 124 *I think the answer is C?*

  • This Question is Closed
  1. Pac1f1cIslander
    • 2 years ago
    Best Response
    You've already chosen the best response.
    Medals 0

    I would think B...

  2. asnaseer
    • 2 years ago
    Best Response
    You've already chosen the best response.
    Medals 3

    look at the first triangle ABC - notice it is a right-angled triangle and one of the angles is 45, so what would the other angle be?

  3. rebeccaskell94
    • 2 years ago
    Best Response
    You've already chosen the best response.
    Medals 0

    45º?

  4. asnaseer
    • 2 years ago
    Best Response
    You've already chosen the best response.
    Medals 3

    correct - so that implies it is also isoceles

  5. asnaseer
    • 2 years ago
    Best Response
    You've already chosen the best response.
    Medals 3

    which means AB=BC=58

  6. Pac1f1cIslander
    • 2 years ago
    Best Response
    You've already chosen the best response.
    Medals 0

    Oh, they're both special triangles...one is 45-45-90, the other is 30-60-90

  7. asnaseer
    • 2 years ago
    Best Response
    You've already chosen the best response.
    Medals 3

    agreed?

  8. rebeccaskell94
    • 2 years ago
    Best Response
    You've already chosen the best response.
    Medals 0

    Agreed.

  9. asnaseer
    • 2 years ago
    Best Response
    You've already chosen the best response.
    Medals 3

    so what would AG=

  10. rebeccaskell94
    • 2 years ago
    Best Response
    You've already chosen the best response.
    Medals 0

    62? I think

  11. asnaseer
    • 2 years ago
    Best Response
    You've already chosen the best response.
    Medals 3

    yes

  12. asnaseer
    • 2 years ago
    Best Response
    You've already chosen the best response.
    Medals 3

    now use the fact that:\[\cos(60)=0.5\]to work out AE

  13. asnaseer
    • 2 years ago
    Best Response
    You've already chosen the best response.
    Medals 3

    sorry - use the fact that:\[\tan(60)=\sqrt(3)\]to work out GE

  14. rebeccaskell94
    • 2 years ago
    Best Response
    You've already chosen the best response.
    Medals 0

    Well, I'm not really sure how to do that. Sorry, I'm dumb when it comes to math. :/

  15. asnaseer
    • 2 years ago
    Best Response
    You've already chosen the best response.
    Medals 3

    are you familiar with trigonometry (sin/cos/tan)?

  16. Pac1f1cIslander
    • 2 years ago
    Best Response
    You've already chosen the best response.
    Medals 0

    62(60)sqrt3

  17. asnaseer
    • 2 years ago
    Best Response
    You've already chosen the best response.
    Medals 3

    if not, then this might help you: http://www.mathsisfun.com/algebra/trig-four-quadrants.html

  18. rebeccaskell94
    • 2 years ago
    Best Response
    You've already chosen the best response.
    Medals 0

    Vaguely, yes. I took geometry 3 years ago and got a B+ and A- but I don't remember most of it :/ I'm trying desperately to help a friend but some of this stuff I just don't remember. I know that tan = opposite ÷ adjacent cos= adjacent ÷ hypotenuse sin= opposite ÷ hypotenuse If I remember those correctly. I'm personally, currently in AlgII :/

  19. asnaseer
    • 2 years ago
    Best Response
    You've already chosen the best response.
    Medals 3

    good, so look at triangle AEG and note that:\[\tan(60)=\frac{GE}{AG}=\frac{GE}{62}\]

  20. asnaseer
    • 2 years ago
    Best Response
    You've already chosen the best response.
    Medals 3

    which implies:\[GE=62\times\tan(60)\]

  21. asnaseer
    • 2 years ago
    Best Response
    You've already chosen the best response.
    Medals 3

    does that make sense?

  22. rebeccaskell94
    • 2 years ago
    Best Response
    You've already chosen the best response.
    Medals 0

    Ah! Yes. I think so. I had to figure out where the 62 came from again xD

  23. asnaseer
    • 2 years ago
    Best Response
    You've already chosen the best response.
    Medals 3

    good, now some angles have /well known/ values for sin/cos/tan

  24. asnaseer
    • 2 years ago
    Best Response
    You've already chosen the best response.
    Medals 3

    60 is one such angle where: \(\tan(60)=\sqrt{3}\)

  25. asnaseer
    • 2 years ago
    Best Response
    You've already chosen the best response.
    Medals 3

    can you work it out now?

  26. rebeccaskell94
    • 2 years ago
    Best Response
    You've already chosen the best response.
    Medals 0

    Let me try, and then I'll post it :D

  27. asnaseer
    • 2 years ago
    Best Response
    You've already chosen the best response.
    Medals 3

    ok

  28. rebeccaskell94
    • 2 years ago
    Best Response
    You've already chosen the best response.
    Medals 0

    107.26 is 62*1.73

  29. asnaseer
    • 2 years ago
    Best Response
    You've already chosen the best response.
    Medals 3

    roughly yes - you should leave it in terms of the radical, so the answer is \(62\sqrt{3}\)

  30. Not the answer you are looking for?
    Search for more explanations.

    • Attachments:

Ask your own question

Ask a Question
Find more explanations on OpenStudy

Your question is ready. Sign up for free to start getting answers.

spraguer (Moderator)
5 → View Detailed Profile

is replying to Can someone tell me what button the professor is hitting...

23

  • Teamwork 19 Teammate
  • Problem Solving 19 Hero
  • You have blocked this person.
  • ✔ You're a fan Checking fan status...

Thanks for being so helpful in mathematics. If you are getting quality help, make sure you spread the word about OpenStudy.

This is the testimonial you wrote.
You haven't written a testimonial for Owlfred.