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ZiggyKillem

  • 3 years ago

A number is increased by 400% , or 360 . What is the original number?

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  1. sabimaru
    • 3 years ago
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    Try rephrasing it: to get you started... a 400% increase is 4x...

  2. Romero
    • 3 years ago
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    wait what? Is the final number 36)?

  3. Romero
    • 3 years ago
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    360?

  4. ZiggyKillem
    • 3 years ago
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    thats exactly how it says it on the work sheet.

  5. Romero
    • 3 years ago
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    Sorry the questions is confusing... I really hate making assumptions because I can be wrong. Go ask again.

  6. ZiggyKillem
    • 3 years ago
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    okay thank you though.

  7. sabimaru
    • 3 years ago
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    I think the question is phrased simply enough... it's basically saying "400% of a number is 360...what's the number?" so you get 4x = 360 .. solve for x

  8. ZiggyKillem
    • 3 years ago
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    okay thanks ^.^

  9. sabimaru
    • 3 years ago
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    no problem!

  10. Romero
    • 3 years ago
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    No it can also mean that it was raised by 400 or maybe 360 we don't know. Seeing as the value of 400% percent is close to the number 360% making the assumption that 360 is the final number can be a mistake.

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