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(a^5b^3) (a^4b^5) Do I multiply for add the exponents? E.g. would I have a^9 or a^20? Thank you!

Mathematics
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You add the exponents in this case
Oh my goodness... THANK YOU!!!!! Last time I had to ask this question, I was forced to wait 10 minutes for a wrong answer.
you're welcome

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Other answers:

So it is a^9andb^8 correct?
bingo
THANK YOU! Can you answer one more quick question, please?
so \[\Large a^9b^8\]
(-2hi^3)(2h^2ij^3)
multiply -2 and 2 to get?
Would it be -4h^3i^4j^7?
The term for j is j^3 since the first expression doesn't have any j terms
or because (-2hi^3)(2h^2ij^3) really is (-2hi^3j^0)(2h^2ij^3)
So i'm not sure how you're getting 4+3 = 7
-4h^2i^3j^12?
no
What are the exponents for j in (-2hi^3j^0)(2h^2ij^3) ???
Do I not multiply -2 and 2?
yes those are the coefficients
0 and 3
add them
to get the final exponent for j
3
So the answer is \[\Large -4h^3i^4j^3\]
Thank you!!
yw
Okay now, another one! :D ([3^2]^3g^5h^8)^2
What is [3^2]^3
Do you mind if I do the problem by myself, and I'll give you my answer and see if I'm right?
alright
Stay with me, please! :)
ok
729g^10h^16
Yes?
no it's not correct
Huh..
3^2 is 9 So [3^2]^3 = 9^3 = 729 This means ([3^2]^3g^5h^8)^2 becomes (729g^5h^8)^2
did you get that as one of your steps?
Uhm
yes
Then you square everything inside
Oh!
tell me what you get
531,411g^10h^13
16
yes, but I would get rid of the comma....computer answer systems don't like commas
oh yes, 16 not 13
use only commas to separate out answers (like ordered pairs), don't enter commas for large numbers
kk
so the answer is 531411g^10h^16 which looks like \[\Large 531411g^{10}h^{16}\]
uhm
what's wrong?
x(x^4)(x^6)
x = x^1
x^11?
So x(x^4)(x^6) is the same as x^1(x^4)(x^6) or x^1 times x^4 times x^6
yes
x(x^4)(x^6) = x^11
Okay, one more question! :)
ok
|dw:1343517212128:dw|
base is \(\large 5n^3\) ? and height is \(\large 2n^3\) ?
no height in 2n^2
ok
and they want the area?
Express the area of the triangle as monomial.
multiply the two expressions, then cut that result in half to get the area of the triangle
5n^5
you got it
THANK YOU
you're welcome
Oops, I lied. More problems. I might force you to stick around for a bit, but I'm sure I've got this! :)
Why not answer all the ones you can and post them all at once. Remember to post the answers right along with the question Like in the form # 1 Question: .... Answer: .... ====================================== # 2 Question: .... Answer: .... etc etc
(5g^4h^4)^3 125g^7h^7
That should save time
no, now you're multiplying exponents
ex: (x^2)^3 = x^(2*3) = x^6
125g^12h^12, right?
yes
(2a^4b)^2/16b^5
how do I do this?
what is (2a^4b)^2 simplify to?
does*
4x2a^8b^2
where did the x2 come from?
multiplying a^2 with 2 therefore 2a^4
you mean multiply the exponent 4 with 2 to get 8 So a^4 becomes a^8 So (2a^4b)^2 becomes 4a^8b^2
Okay... now what? :0
So (2a^4b)^2/16b^5 becomes 4a^8b^2/16b^5
Now reduce
so 4/16 = ??? a^8b^2 over b^5 = ???
a^8/8b^3
close a^8b^2 over b^5 becomes a^8 over b^3
but 4/16 is NOT 1/8
When I have problems seeing if I have to add or multiply exponents what I do is expand everything. For example let's take \[(a^5) *(a^4)\]let's expand that \[(a *a*a*a*a)*(a*a*a*a)\] Which is basically \[a^9\]

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