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lgbasallote

uranium hexafluoride is a solid at room temperature, but it boils at \(56^o C\).determine the density of uranium hexafluoride at \(60^o C\) and 745 torr. i know d = m/v and PV = nRT but how can i use them here? or do i even use them here?

  • one year ago
  • one year ago

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  1. zbay
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    you can solve for n and get the mass using the periodic table and then you can solve for v

    • one year ago
  2. lgbasallote
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    will you please elaborate?

    • one year ago
  3. Carniel
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    Just get m and v :P

    • one year ago
  4. lgbasallote
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    how to get V?

    • one year ago
  5. lgbasallote
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    and m

    • one year ago
  6. Carniel
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    Use the other formula to find them ^_^

    • one year ago
  7. lgbasallote
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    how the heck can i get m o.O

    • one year ago
  8. lgbasallote
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    and V

    • one year ago
  9. lgbasallote
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    i dont think the "other formulas" can be applied

    • one year ago
  10. lgbasallote
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    can you demonstrate how>

    • one year ago
  11. NotTim
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    wats torr

    • one year ago
  12. lgbasallote
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    if i remember right 760 torr = 1 atm...torr is a unit of measurement for pressure

    • one year ago
  13. NotTim
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    p=745 torr v=? n=? R=? T=60-56 (i think) d=? (looking for) m=? v=?

    • one year ago
  14. NotTim
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    Oh...Waht about Mm?

    • one year ago
  15. NotTim
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    on what @zbay say.

    • one year ago
  16. NotTim
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    but you still need m huh

    • one year ago
  17. SUROJ
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    do you know \[p =\rho \times r \times T \div M\] where rho is density and M is molecular mass

    • one year ago
  18. SUROJ
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    P is pressure

    • one year ago
  19. SUROJ
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    since n= m/M , you can get m/V = rho

    • one year ago
  20. lgbasallote
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    uhhh could you rewrite that equation you wrote? kinda vague... \[\huge P = \frac{\rho RT}{M}\]

    • one year ago
  21. lgbasallote
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    is that right?

    • one year ago
  22. SUROJ
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    ya

    • one year ago
  23. SUROJ
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    looks like it works :)

    • one year ago
  24. lgbasallote
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    how did you get this formula again?

    • one year ago
  25. SUROJ
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    n=m/M right?

    • one year ago
  26. lgbasallote
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    oh i see now

    • one year ago
  27. lgbasallote
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    so \[\frac{PM}{RT} = \rho\] right? R = 0.0821

    • one year ago
  28. SUROJ
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    ya exactly

    • one year ago
  29. lgbasallote
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    so which T am i going to use?

    • one year ago
  30. lgbasallote
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    60?

    • one year ago
  31. NotTim
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    probably, because that's the one that applies to this situation

    • one year ago
  32. SUROJ
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    the temperature at which u have to find density

    • one year ago
  33. lgbasallote
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    so what's 56 for? just a distraction?

    • one year ago
  34. SUROJ
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    ya I guess

    • one year ago
  35. lgbasallote
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    hmm then i need to convert torr into atm and C into K right

    • one year ago
  36. SUROJ
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    yup and 1 torr = 1 atm

    • one year ago
  37. lgbasallote
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    i thought it was 760 torr = 1 atm o.O

    • one year ago
  38. SUROJ
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    oo idk

    • one year ago
  39. lgbasallote
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    hmm okay thanks

    • one year ago
  40. lgbasallote
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    what would be the unit?

    • one year ago
  41. lgbasallote
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    i got the answer as 126.76 g/L is that right?

    • one year ago
  42. NotTim
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    i dunno

    • one year ago
  43. zbay
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    set n to 1 and solve for V then you take the molar mass of the molecule you are looking at and calculate your density

    • one year ago
  44. zbay
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    R is a constant.

    • one year ago
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