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a.galvan2

  • 3 years ago

9x^2+30x+25=64

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  1. ParthKohli
    • 3 years ago
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    A good start is subtracting 64 from both sides.\[ \color{Black}{\Rightarrow 9x^2 + 3x + 25 - 64 = 0}\] Simplify, and solve the quadratic equation.

  2. a.galvan2
    • 3 years ago
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    the 9x^2 is what I am confused about.

  3. Ganpat
    • 3 years ago
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    confused ??

  4. Ganpat
    • 3 years ago
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    u can solve it by factorization...

  5. BougyMan
    • 3 years ago
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    (9x^2+3x)(25-64)

  6. Ganpat
    • 3 years ago
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    9x2+30x+25=64 9x2+30x+25-64 = 0 9x2+30x-39 = 0 9x2 -9x + 39x -39 = 0 9x(x-1) +39 (x-1) = 0 (9x +39) (x-1) = 0 so, x = -39/9 and x =1....

  7. a.galvan2
    • 3 years ago
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    sorry, but I do know the answer involves imaginary numbers.

  8. agentx5
    • 3 years ago
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    Actually no... The solutions for x as an answer does not involve imaginary #'s, and it's not 59/3

  9. agentx5
    • 3 years ago
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    @Ganpat is correct.

  10. cornitodisc
    • 3 years ago
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    ah..so my answer was wrong...sorry

  11. agentx5
    • 3 years ago
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    With the imaginary line, it's the intersection: |dw:1343664593480:dw|

  12. a.galvan2
    • 3 years ago
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    The answer in the back of the book is \[x=(-10+2i \sqrt14)/6, (-10-2i \sqrt14)/6 \] I just can't figure out how it got there.

  13. agentx5
    • 3 years ago
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    The blue line is (3x+5)^2 The imaginary line is 64i

  14. agentx5
    • 3 years ago
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    That answer is crazy, this has solvable real number values. Yes you can combine those to get X, but why?

  15. agentx5
    • 3 years ago
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    In this case I'd say either the problem was written down for us incorrectly/incomplete-directions, or the book is making it a whole lot harder than it needs be...

  16. a.galvan2
    • 3 years ago
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    i do not know.

  17. agentx5
    • 3 years ago
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    :-S Go with what @Ganpat said, unless there's something missing or incorrect here with regards to the question and it's directions as you wrote it here. He's 100% correct.

  18. agentx5
    • 3 years ago
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    Plug in those values for x and you'll it works.

  19. Ganpat
    • 3 years ago
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    @agentx5 : when did i say that ? :D.. lol

  20. agentx5
    • 3 years ago
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    Huh? o_O

  21. Ganpat
    • 3 years ago
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    kidding dude !! :)

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