Quantcast

Got Homework?

Connect with other students for help. It's a free community.

  • across
    MIT Grad Student
    Online now
  • laura*
    Helped 1,000 students
    Online now
  • Hero
    College Math Guru
    Online now

Here's the question you clicked on:

55 members online
  • 0 replying
  • 0 viewing

lgbasallote Group Title

Which of the following is NOT soluble in water? A) NaCl B) KBr C) CH3CH2OH D) HCl E) C6H6 and how do i know?

  • 2 years ago
  • 2 years ago

  • This Question is Closed
  1. lgbasallote Group Title
    Best Response
    You've already chosen the best response.
    Medals 1

    i know for sure it's not A

    • 2 years ago
  2. cwrw238 Group Title
    Best Response
    You've already chosen the best response.
    Medals 1

    its C6H6 (benzene)

    • 2 years ago
  3. lgbasallote Group Title
    Best Response
    You've already chosen the best response.
    Medals 1

    since when did you go green o.O

    • 2 years ago
  4. lgbasallote Group Title
    Best Response
    You've already chosen the best response.
    Medals 1

    and why do you say so/

    • 2 years ago
  5. cwrw238 Group Title
    Best Response
    You've already chosen the best response.
    Medals 1

    yesterday

    • 2 years ago
  6. cwrw238 Group Title
    Best Response
    You've already chosen the best response.
    Medals 1

    why do i say its benzene?

    • 2 years ago
  7. lgbasallote Group Title
    Best Response
    You've already chosen the best response.
    Medals 1

    yes...how would you know?

    • 2 years ago
  8. lgbasallote Group Title
    Best Response
    You've already chosen the best response.
    Medals 1

    im thinking it would have something to do with adhesion and cohesion? or no?

    • 2 years ago
  9. cwrw238 Group Title
    Best Response
    You've already chosen the best response.
    Medals 1

    ok KBr is a soluble salt - an ionic compound ch3ch2oh is alcohol - it mixes well with my whisky benzene is a liquid which if you add to water forms a separate layer its an aromatic organic compound

    • 2 years ago
  10. lgbasallote Group Title
    Best Response
    You've already chosen the best response.
    Medals 1

    ok...assuming i have no idea what you just said and i lack the experience to think like that...how else can i know?

    • 2 years ago
  11. cwrw238 Group Title
    Best Response
    You've already chosen the best response.
    Medals 1

    hmm - well all i can say its a hydrocarbon which are not usually soluble in water.

    • 2 years ago
  12. lgbasallote Group Title
    Best Response
    You've already chosen the best response.
    Medals 1

    im thinking it has something to do with cohesion-adhesion or hydrogen bonding or IMFA or something >.<

    • 2 years ago
  13. lgbasallote Group Title
    Best Response
    You've already chosen the best response.
    Medals 1

    im so confused

    • 2 years ago
  14. cwrw238 Group Title
    Best Response
    You've already chosen the best response.
    Medals 1

    yes - benzene would not take part in hydrogen bonding - that might be it - the molecule is hexagonal and very stable. sorry i can't be of more help

    • 2 years ago
  15. lgbasallote Group Title
    Best Response
    You've already chosen the best response.
    Medals 1

    why do you say stable? and what does stability have anything to do with h-bonding?

    • 2 years ago
  16. cwrw238 Group Title
    Best Response
    You've already chosen the best response.
    Medals 1

    benzene does not react with water at room temperature and only reacts with strong reagents at elevated temperatures the hexagonal arrangement makes for strong bonding.

    • 2 years ago
  17. lgbasallote Group Title
    Best Response
    You've already chosen the best response.
    Medals 1

    well im gonna need a more general answer :(

    • 2 years ago
  18. lgbasallote Group Title
    Best Response
    You've already chosen the best response.
    Medals 1

    what makes a compound not react with water

    • 2 years ago
  19. cwrw238 Group Title
    Best Response
    You've already chosen the best response.
    Medals 1

    in alcohol for instance the hydrogen in OH bit is partially charge and attacks the H3O ion in the water. this can't happen with benzene

    • 2 years ago
  20. cwrw238 Group Title
    Best Response
    You've already chosen the best response.
    Medals 1

    *attracts not attacks

    • 2 years ago
  21. cwrw238 Group Title
    Best Response
    You've already chosen the best response.
    Medals 1

    gotta go now - my chemistry knowledge is pretty rusty I'm afraid

    • 2 years ago
  22. lgbasallote Group Title
    Best Response
    You've already chosen the best response.
    Medals 1

    aww ok

    • 2 years ago
  23. SanjanaP Group Title
    Best Response
    You've already chosen the best response.
    Medals 1

    I think It is C6H6 I think that is right :O

    • 2 years ago
  24. lgbasallote Group Title
    Best Response
    You've already chosen the best response.
    Medals 1

    HOW to know which it is? im not really interested what the answer is

    • 2 years ago
  25. NotTim Group Title
    Best Response
    You've already chosen the best response.
    Medals 1

    why not just use a solubility table? most textbooks are provided witt one in the appendix...

    • 2 years ago
  26. lgbasallote Group Title
    Best Response
    You've already chosen the best response.
    Medals 1

    this is for a quiz...we dont have books in quizzes...i need to know HOW

    • 2 years ago
  27. NotTim Group Title
    Best Response
    You've already chosen the best response.
    Medals 1

    ...

    • 2 years ago
  28. NotTim Group Title
    Best Response
    You've already chosen the best response.
    Medals 1

    am i allowed answering this?

    • 2 years ago
  29. lgbasallote Group Title
    Best Response
    You've already chosen the best response.
    Medals 1

    what do you mean?

    • 2 years ago
  30. NotTim Group Title
    Best Response
    You've already chosen the best response.
    Medals 1

    am i allowed answerign things related to marked papers?

    • 2 years ago
  31. lgbasallote Group Title
    Best Response
    You've already chosen the best response.
    Medals 1

    this isnt a marked paper

    • 2 years ago
  32. lgbasallote Group Title
    Best Response
    You've already chosen the best response.
    Medals 1

    im trying to review for my quiz in a few hours

    • 2 years ago
  33. lgbasallote Group Title
    Best Response
    You've already chosen the best response.
    Medals 1

    what i was saying was that in our quiz we dont have books with solubilty table thingies so i shouldnt rely on it

    • 2 years ago
  34. lgbasallote Group Title
    Best Response
    You've already chosen the best response.
    Medals 1

    anyway my question is just "HOW TO KNOW WHICH COMPUOUND IS SOLUBLE AND WHICH IS NOT"

    • 2 years ago
  35. GOODMAN Group Title
    Best Response
    You've already chosen the best response.
    Medals 0

    Wow.

    • 2 years ago
  36. lgbasallote Group Title
    Best Response
    You've already chosen the best response.
    Medals 1

    ?

    • 2 years ago
  37. GOODMAN Group Title
    Best Response
    You've already chosen the best response.
    Medals 0

    Goodluck :D

    • 2 years ago
  38. lgbasallote Group Title
    Best Response
    You've already chosen the best response.
    Medals 1

    lol :p

    • 2 years ago
  39. NotTim Group Title
    Best Response
    You've already chosen the best response.
    Medals 1

    I was provided a solubility charts eh, for my examination.... http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Solubility_chart

    • 2 years ago
  40. lgbasallote Group Title
    Best Response
    You've already chosen the best response.
    Medals 1

    but without a solubility chart...how to know?

    • 2 years ago
  41. NotTim Group Title
    Best Response
    You've already chosen the best response.
    Medals 1

    i think it was related to the ions and charges tho. to figure it out

    • 2 years ago
  42. lgbasallote Group Title
    Best Response
    You've already chosen the best response.
    Medals 1

    im assuming it has something to do with hydrogen bonding or something

    • 2 years ago
  43. lgbasallote Group Title
    Best Response
    You've already chosen the best response.
    Medals 1

    but none of the elements are ions o.O

    • 2 years ago
  44. NotTim Group Title
    Best Response
    You've already chosen the best response.
    Medals 1

    Ahem. Wikipedia is my source. Please do not quote me on this.

    • 2 years ago
  45. NotTim Group Title
    Best Response
    You've already chosen the best response.
    Medals 1

    Solubility of ionic compounds in water Main article: Solubility chart Main article: Solubility table Some ionic compounds (salts) dissolve in water, which arises because of the attraction between positive and negative charges (see: solvation). For example, the salt's positive ions (e.g. Ag+) attract the partially negative oxygens in H2O. Likewise, the salt's negative ions (e.g. Cl−) attract the partially positive hydrogens in H2O. Note: oxygen is partially negative because it is more electronegative than hydrogen, and vice-versa (see: chemical polarity). AgCl(s) Ag+(aq) + Cl−(aq) However, there is a limit to how much salt can be dissolved in a given volume of water. This amount is given by the solubility product, Ksp. This value depends on the type of salt (AgCl vs. NaCl, for example), temperature, and the common ion effect. One can calculate the amount of AgCl that will dissolve in 1 liter of water, some algebra is required. Ksp = [Ag+] × [Cl−] (definition of solubility product) Ksp = 1.8 × 10−10 (from a table of solubility products) [Ag+] = [Cl−], in the absence of other silver or chloride salts, [Ag+]2 = 1.8 × 10−10 [Ag+] = 1.34 × 10−5 The result: 1 liter of water can dissolve 1.34 × 10−5 moles of AgCl(s) at room temperature. Compared with other types of salts, AgCl is poorly soluble in water. In contrast, table salt (NaCl) has a higher Ksp and is, therefore, more soluble. Soluble Insoluble Group I and NH4+ compounds Carbonates (Except Group I, NH4+ and uranyl compounds) Nitrates Sulfites (Except Group I and NH4+ compounds) Acetates (Ethanoates) (Except Ag+ compounds) Phosphates (Except Group I and NH4+ compounds) Chlorides (Chlorates and Perchlorates), bromides and iodides (Except Ag+, Pb2+, Cu+ and Hg22+) Hydroxides and oxides (Except Group I, NH4+, Ba2+, Sr2+ and Tl+) Sulfates (Except Ag+, Pb2+, Ba2+, Sr2+ and Ca2+) Sulfides (Except Group I, Group II and NH4+ compounds) Hydroxides (Only with (aq) Ba2+, Li+, Na+, K+, Rb+, Cs+, Fr+ )

    • 2 years ago
  46. NotTim Group Title
    Best Response
    You've already chosen the best response.
    Medals 1

    http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Solubility#Solubility_of_ionic_compounds_in_water

    • 2 years ago
  47. lgbasallote Group Title
    Best Response
    You've already chosen the best response.
    Medals 1

    hmm so it's ion induced dipole huh

    • 2 years ago
  48. lgbasallote Group Title
    Best Response
    You've already chosen the best response.
    Medals 1

    wonder how i'll know when it happens :/

    • 2 years ago
  49. NotTim Group Title
    Best Response
    You've already chosen the best response.
    Medals 1

    possibly the molecule's attraction to the hydrogen in water makes it more soluble?

    • 2 years ago
  50. lgbasallote Group Title
    Best Response
    You've already chosen the best response.
    Medals 1

    how would i know that by llooking at the compounds?

    • 2 years ago
  51. NotTim Group Title
    Best Response
    You've already chosen the best response.
    Medals 1

    maybe not by looking at the compounds, but the periodic table?

    • 2 years ago
  52. lgbasallote Group Title
    Best Response
    You've already chosen the best response.
    Medals 1

    what do you mean?

    • 2 years ago
  53. NotTim Group Title
    Best Response
    You've already chosen the best response.
    Medals 1

    wait..that's electronegativity, charges and such...

    • 2 years ago
  54. lgbasallote Group Title
    Best Response
    You've already chosen the best response.
    Medals 1

    yeah...

    • 2 years ago
  55. NotTim Group Title
    Best Response
    You've already chosen the best response.
    Medals 1

    wait...

    • 2 years ago
  56. NotTim Group Title
    Best Response
    You've already chosen the best response.
    Medals 1

    For example, the salt's positive ions (e.g. Ag+) attract the partially negative oxygens in H2O. Likewise, the salt's negative ions (e.g. Cl−) attract the partially positive hydrogens in H2O. Note: oxygen is partially negative because it is more electronegative than hydrogen, and vice-versa (see: chemical polarity). AgCl(s) Ag+(aq) + Cl−(aq)

    • 2 years ago
  57. NotTim Group Title
    Best Response
    You've already chosen the best response.
    Medals 1

    However, there is a limit to how much salt can be dissolved in a given volume of water. This amount is given by the solubility product, Ksp. This value depends on the type of salt (AgCl vs. NaCl, for example), temperature, and the common ion effect. One can calculate the amount of AgCl that will dissolve in 1 liter of water, some algebra is required. Ksp = [Ag+] × [Cl−] (definition of solubility product) Ksp = 1.8 × 10−10 (from a table of solubility products)

    • 2 years ago
  58. NotTim Group Title
    Best Response
    You've already chosen the best response.
    Medals 1

    The result: 1 liter of water can dissolve 1.34 × 10−5 moles of AgCl(s) at room temperature. Compared with other types of salts, AgCl is poorly soluble in water. In contrast, table salt (NaCl) has a higher Ksp and is, therefore, more soluble.

    • 2 years ago
  59. NotTim Group Title
    Best Response
    You've already chosen the best response.
    Medals 1

    In relation to the points I posted: 1. Electronegativity DOEs play a role in solubility. 2. Using Ksp to find solubility. 3. Is a Ksp table provided?

    • 2 years ago
  60. zbay Group Title
    Best Response
    You've already chosen the best response.
    Medals 0

    with out looking it up i'm saying e is not soluble because it's molecular

    • 2 years ago
  61. lgbasallote Group Title
    Best Response
    You've already chosen the best response.
    Medals 1

    what do you mean molecular?

    • 2 years ago
  62. zbay Group Title
    Best Response
    You've already chosen the best response.
    Medals 0

    it's a metal bonded to a non metal

    • 2 years ago
  63. lgbasallote Group Title
    Best Response
    You've already chosen the best response.
    Medals 1

    you mean an ionic bond?

    • 2 years ago
  64. lgbasallote Group Title
    Best Response
    You've already chosen the best response.
    Medals 1

    but NaCl is ionic too...

    • 2 years ago
  65. lgbasallote Group Title
    Best Response
    You've already chosen the best response.
    Medals 1

    and wait...isnt c6h6 nonmetal + nonmetal?

    • 2 years ago
  66. NotTim Group Title
    Best Response
    You've already chosen the best response.
    Medals 1

    c6h6 is a organic compound...

    • 2 years ago
  67. zbay Group Title
    Best Response
    You've already chosen the best response.
    Medals 0

    right and it wont disolbe in water

    • 2 years ago
  68. lgbasallote Group Title
    Best Response
    You've already chosen the best response.
    Medals 1

    because it's nonmetal + nonmetal?

    • 2 years ago
  69. NotTim Group Title
    Best Response
    You've already chosen the best response.
    Medals 1

    i think so...i don't think hexane, octane, etc dissolves easily in water...it just floats on top right

    • 2 years ago
  70. lgbasallote Group Title
    Best Response
    You've already chosen the best response.
    Medals 1

    but HCl is non metal + nonmetal too...

    • 2 years ago
  71. zbay Group Title
    Best Response
    You've already chosen the best response.
    Medals 0

    hcl is a strong acid so it totaly ionizes

    • 2 years ago
  72. NotTim Group Title
    Best Response
    You've already chosen the best response.
    Medals 1

    HCl is an acid.

    • 2 years ago
  73. NotTim Group Title
    Best Response
    You've already chosen the best response.
    Medals 1

    and when added with water, loses its H, making it Cl2, and causes the water to become hydronium

    • 2 years ago
  74. lgbasallote Group Title
    Best Response
    You've already chosen the best response.
    Medals 1

    but zbay said c6h6 does not dissolve because it's metal + nonmetal but NaCl is metal + nonmetal too if it's nonmetal + nonmetal HCl is nonmetal + nonmetal too

    • 2 years ago
  75. lgbasallote Group Title
    Best Response
    You've already chosen the best response.
    Medals 1

    so what's the reason c6h6 does not dissolve?

    • 2 years ago
  76. zbay Group Title
    Best Response
    You've already chosen the best response.
    Medals 0

    i ment non metal non metal or molecular, and hcl is a strong acid making very soluble

    • 2 years ago
  77. NotTim Group Title
    Best Response
    You've already chosen the best response.
    Medals 1

    Well, for one, It's got tons of hydrogen bonding...

    • 2 years ago
  78. zbay Group Title
    Best Response
    You've already chosen the best response.
    Medals 0

    because its molecular and because of that it doesn't disolve in water.

    • 2 years ago
  79. NotTim Group Title
    Best Response
    You've already chosen the best response.
    Medals 1

    course, we may just be mixing this all up...I suggest the solubility table...

    • 2 years ago
  80. lgbasallote Group Title
    Best Response
    You've already chosen the best response.
    Medals 1

    but why does HCl dissolve in water if it's molecular too?

    • 2 years ago
  81. NotTim Group Title
    Best Response
    You've already chosen the best response.
    Medals 1

    It's simpler-less hydrogen bonds.

    • 2 years ago
  82. NotTim Group Title
    Best Response
    You've already chosen the best response.
    Medals 1

    only 1, compared to 6 in c6h6

    • 2 years ago
  83. zbay Group Title
    Best Response
    You've already chosen the best response.
    Medals 0

    Hydrogen can act as a metal or non-metal so in this case it's acting as a metal

    • 2 years ago
  84. zbay Group Title
    Best Response
    You've already chosen the best response.
    Medals 0

    hydrogen bonding is a IMF and has nothing to do with that Tim

    • 2 years ago
  85. NotTim Group Title
    Best Response
    You've already chosen the best response.
    Medals 1

    wats imf? it doesn't matter?

    • 2 years ago
  86. NotTim Group Title
    Best Response
    You've already chosen the best response.
    Medals 1

    ...it doesn't matter whether or not its metal does it? just the electronegativities?

    • 2 years ago
  87. zbay Group Title
    Best Response
    You've already chosen the best response.
    Medals 0

    an IMF is a intramolecular force and is responsible for how molecules behave around each other

    • 2 years ago
  88. NotTim Group Title
    Best Response
    You've already chosen the best response.
    Medals 1

    isn't that important for solubility, as we are looking for the chemicals' ability to be dissolved in water. Whatever affects the forces must affect the solubility too right?

    • 2 years ago
  89. lgbasallote Group Title
    Best Response
    You've already chosen the best response.
    Medals 1

    so how does IMF affect ths situation?

    • 2 years ago
  90. zbay Group Title
    Best Response
    You've already chosen the best response.
    Medals 0

    IMF has nothing to do with solubility, we are just trying to figure out if something will disolve here. So by a just remember that if the compound is molecular it doesn't disolve.

    • 2 years ago
  91. NotTim Group Title
    Best Response
    You've already chosen the best response.
    Medals 1

    Polarity?

    • 2 years ago
  92. NotTim Group Title
    Best Response
    You've already chosen the best response.
    Medals 1

    Nitrates, acetates, and ammonium though DO dissolve

    • 2 years ago
  93. NotTim Group Title
    Best Response
    You've already chosen the best response.
    Medals 1

    in water

    • 2 years ago
  94. zbay Group Title
    Best Response
    You've already chosen the best response.
    Medals 0

    look i'm not trying to debate this all night the answer to the questoin is e in my opinion. There are other exeptions to these rules but the majority of the time just find the molecular compound and assume it wont be soluble. if you want to read about all the exeptions google solubilty rules

    • 2 years ago
  95. NotTim Group Title
    Best Response
    You've already chosen the best response.
    Medals 1

    http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Solubility#Solubility_of_ionic_compounds_in_water

    • 2 years ago
  96. NotTim Group Title
    Best Response
    You've already chosen the best response.
    Medals 1

    (Solubility table!)

    • 2 years ago
  97. Outkast3r09 Group Title
    Best Response
    You've already chosen the best response.
    Medals 0

    -_- It has to do with the bonds/the charge of the polyatomic ions of the Chemicals. If you say otherwise you don't understand what happens when you dissolve a compound.

    • one year ago
  98. lgbasallote Group Title
    Best Response
    You've already chosen the best response.
    Medals 1

    me? yeah i really dont

    • one year ago
  99. Outkast3r09 Group Title
    Best Response
    You've already chosen the best response.
    Medals 0

    It has with the polarity of h2o pulling the positive ions from the compound

    • one year ago
  100. Outkast3r09 Group Title
    Best Response
    You've already chosen the best response.
    Medals 0

    or the cations i should say

    • one year ago
  101. Kryten Group Title
    Best Response
    You've already chosen the best response.
    Medals 1

    i didnt read all answers but you can take guidence in this rule: similar is soluble in similar by which i mean POLARITY!!! polar molecules will dissolve in water while non polar in non polar solutes like benzene, toluene, THF(tetra hydro furane)...

    • one year ago
  102. foodscientist Group Title
    Best Response
    You've already chosen the best response.
    Medals 0

    like dissolves like..

    • one year ago
  103. lgbasallote Group Title
    Best Response
    You've already chosen the best response.
    Medals 1

    what does that mean?

    • one year ago
  104. lgbasallote Group Title
    Best Response
    You've already chosen the best response.
    Medals 1

    i mean "like dissolves like" and btw..is nacl polar? isnt it ionic???

    • one year ago
  105. Kryten Group Title
    Best Response
    You've already chosen the best response.
    Medals 1

    that means that salts like NaCl you mentioned will naturally be dissolved in water, other polar molecules like C2H5OH which have small organic groups and polar group will also dissolve in water cause in their case polarity of polar group (in this case OH) is significant, but for example fats and oils which are consisted of large organic chains will not dissolve in water (you can see that in soup where oil or fat floats on soup) but those will dissolve in nonpolar liquids (molecules) like toluene, benzene etc. because they are not polar...

    • one year ago
  106. am01656 Group Title
    Best Response
    You've already chosen the best response.
    Medals 0

    for me, how to know the solubility are based on the BONDS. ionic compounds = soluble. covalent compounds = insoluble except in certain compounds, ex. HCl)

    • one year ago
    • Attachments:

See more questions >>>

Your question is ready. Sign up for free to start getting answers.

spraguer (Moderator)
5 → View Detailed Profile

is replying to Can someone tell me what button the professor is hitting...

23

  • Teamwork 19 Teammate
  • Problem Solving 19 Hero
  • You have blocked this person.
  • ✔ You're a fan Checking fan status...

Thanks for being so helpful in mathematics. If you are getting quality help, make sure you spread the word about OpenStudy.

This is the testimonial you wrote.
You haven't written a testimonial for Owlfred.