Ace school

with brainly

  • Get help from millions of students
  • Learn from experts with step-by-step explanations
  • Level-up by helping others

A community for students.

Is voltaege zero for a conductor in electrostatic eq? I was thinking no, but since V=Ed it seems like there could be a difference in V by virtue of the particles being a certain distance apart. Could anyone explain Thanks!

OCW Scholar - Physics II: Electricity and Magnetism
See more answers at brainly.com
At vero eos et accusamus et iusto odio dignissimos ducimus qui blanditiis praesentium voluptatum deleniti atque corrupti quos dolores et quas molestias excepturi sint occaecati cupiditate non provident, similique sunt in culpa qui officia deserunt mollitia animi, id est laborum et dolorum fuga. Et harum quidem rerum facilis est et expedita distinctio. Nam libero tempore, cum soluta nobis est eligendi optio cumque nihil impedit quo minus id quod maxime placeat facere possimus, omnis voluptas assumenda est, omnis dolor repellendus. Itaque earum rerum hic tenetur a sapiente delectus, ut aut reiciendis voluptatibus maiores alias consequatur aut perferendis doloribus asperiores repellat.

Join Brainly to access

this expert answer

SIGN UP FOR FREE
@choupi it's change in voltage = E.change in distance that is \[dv=E.dx or E= dv/dx\] so what you are asking is bit unclear...but as far as i can understand it's just drifting of electrons under the influence of electric field that gives change in potential
The electric field inside a conductor is always zero (for electrostatics), see: http://ocw.mit.edu/courses/physics/8-02sc-physics-ii-electricity-and-magnetism-fall-2010/conductors-and-insulators-conductors-as-shields/MIT8_02SC_notes9.pdf "Module 9: Conductors and Insulators" on page 16. Hence, the potential difference in that conductor is always zero. The whole conductor can however have a potential difference in respect to a reference point. This depends on the reference (eg. infinity where E=0) as well as the charge on and the geometry of the conductor.
good question E=-dv/dx since the electricfield inside the coductor is always zero you can make out that the potential inside a conductor is always constant.IT NEVER CHANGES.1 conductor 1 potential.Therefore potential difference inside a conductor is always zero.

Not the answer you are looking for?

Search for more explanations.

Ask your own question

Other answers:

take a gaussian surface,just inside the conductor.now gauss law says \[\int\limits_{?}^{?}E.dA=(Const)q _{enclosed}\]and Q enclosed is 0 we have E is 0.now all the conductors charges lie on the outer surface,as they would lie max dist apart...is this the answer to your ques?well there could arise a question from this reasoning...ie..we proved that.\[\int\limits_{?}^{?}E.dA\] is 0 but it may not necessarily imply E is 0....but that can also be proved as E is a consv field.....
it was not a contradiction..in fact your questing was not clear do u mean outside the conductor or inside? outside bearing no ext charges,E also 0 for the same reason..gauss law(when i meant,in the above reasoning that,take a gaussian surfacejust inside the conductor it means just inside its surface) but if there were ext charges E MAY not be 0
well a practical application of above is..... u r advised to sit in cars on a rainy day,as any amount of thunder,may not effect you as you are in a closed metallic shell

Not the answer you are looking for?

Search for more explanations.

Ask your own question