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Even though Christians believe in the Trinity (God, the Son, and the Holy Spirit), can they still be considered monotheistic?

HippoCampus Religion
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Not all Christians believe in the Trinity. And those who do are wrong to do so. Jesus talks to his father(God) while he was on earth. How can they be the same person? God is the one and only god. Jesus is his son. Holy spirit is God's active force.
It all comes down to the church's way of interpreting the Bible.
as in, respective churches.

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Other answers:

Yes, monotheism is an essential Christian doctrine. The New Testament affirms it in many places, including Rom 3:30, 1Co 8:6, Eph 4:6, 1Ti 2:5
Yes, the Trinity in One.
I'm just speculating, but couldn't this have just been a way for early Christians to just appeal to early followers that became converts of other polytheistic faiths already used to worshiping a divine triad such as: In ancient Egypt there were many triads: Osiris (husband), Isis (wife), and Horus (son), the Theban triad of Amun, Mut and Khonsu the Memphite triad of Ptah, Sekhmet and Nefertem the Elephantine triad of Khnum (god of the source of the Nile river), Satet (the personification of the floods of the Nile river), and Anuket (the Goddess of the nile river). The Classical Greek Olympic triad of Zeus (king of the gods), Athena (goddess of war and intellect) and Apollo (god of the sun, culture and music) Babylonian Triad of Sin, the Moon, Shamash, the Sun,and Ishtar in the form of a star representing the planet Venus. ...And although I am not an anthropologist major I believe it is safe to assume that the Canaanite religion may have had the greatest influence on what would later become the Israelite religion: Triad of Beelshamên (Canaanite): Baal, described as “Lord of the Sky” or “Rider of the Clouds” appears between the moon-god Aglibol to his right and the sun-god Malakbel to his left. Here are some websites that I found very useful during my research: http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Triple_deity http://english.louvrebible.org/index.php/louvrebible/default/visiteguidee?id_oeuvre=115 http://www.adath-shalom.ca/israelite_religion.htm#icangods
* If you go to the second link, you will find a text accompanied by an ancient relief that would clarify the Canaanite Triad explanation better.
I am apostolic pentacotstal and we don't believe in trinity! We believe very simliar but not the same

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