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b.l.m

  • 3 years ago

Suppose you roll one die. What is the probability of rolling a multiple of 3?

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  1. anonymous
    • 3 years ago
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    only multiples of 3 on one die are 3 and 6

  2. ashna
    • 3 years ago
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    Well on a die there is number 1,2,3,4,5,6. both 3 & 6 are multiples of three. So there is a possibility of you rolling the 2 out of 6 giving the probabilitty 2/6, which simplifies to 1/3.

  3. anonymous
    • 3 years ago
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    in other words, there are two multiples of 3 on one die, and six sides in total, so it is the ratio of the number of multiples of 3 to the total number of faces

  4. b.l.m
    • 3 years ago
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    so is the answer 3 or 1/3

  5. ashna
    • 3 years ago
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    1/3

  6. anonymous
    • 3 years ago
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    whoa hold the phone a probability is always less than or equal to 1

  7. ashna
    • 3 years ago
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    do you understand the way it is done ?

  8. anonymous
    • 3 years ago
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    so never give an answer like 2 or 3 in plain english this says you would roll a 3 or 6 about one third of the time

  9. ashna
    • 3 years ago
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    yea .. something like 0.333 or 1/3 .

  10. b.l.m
    • 3 years ago
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    okay

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