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SUROJ

  • 3 years ago

Anybody here knows what is distance formula for curved geometry?

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  1. SUROJ
    • 3 years ago
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    in non-euclidean geometry

  2. yummydum
    • 3 years ago
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    why are you learning non-euclidean... o.O

  3. completeidiot
    • 3 years ago
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    are you refering to line integrals?

  4. SUROJ
    • 3 years ago
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    I am trying to find speed of light using non-euclidean geometry........

  5. SUROJ
    • 3 years ago
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    @completeidiot Actually I need formula to find distance between two points in curved space....... is that same as line integral?

  6. completeidiot
    • 3 years ago
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    there is a formula, but i dont know it off the top of my head

  7. SUROJ
    • 3 years ago
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    can you give me any clue or the name of formula? I will look online too

  8. completeidiot
    • 3 years ago
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    \[\int\limits_{a}^{b}\sqrt{1+[f'(x)]^2}dx\]

  9. SUROJ
    • 3 years ago
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    that's line integral isn't that? I took calc II

  10. completeidiot
    • 3 years ago
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    too many note books to look through

  11. completeidiot
    • 3 years ago
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    http://tutorial.math.lamar.edu/Classes/CalcIII/VectorArcLength.aspx

  12. panlac01
    • 3 years ago
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    the speed of light is constant. if that meant something to you :)

  13. panlac01
    • 3 years ago
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    http://www.astro.ucla.edu/~wright/relatvty.htm

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