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CalculusHelp

  • 3 years ago

How do you find horizontal and vertical asymptotes? I know that for Horizontal I must find the left and right limits of infinity but I'm not sure about vertical asymptotes.

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  1. dpaInc
    • 3 years ago
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    for rational functions like \(\large f(x)=\frac{g(x)}{h(x)} \), it's what makes g(x) = 0...

  2. dpaInc
    • 3 years ago
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    *** sorry, h(x) = 0

  3. richyw
    • 3 years ago
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    alright well if you have a rational function. you get a vertical asymptote if the denominator is zero

  4. richyw
    • 3 years ago
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    or like what dpalnc said in a better way

  5. richyw
    • 3 years ago
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    so usually in elementary calculus you just have some polynomal, then you just gotta factor it and find the roots of the polynomial

  6. richyw
    • 3 years ago
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    or a trig function or something

  7. CalculusHelp
    • 3 years ago
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    Ohh okay thanks for the help, I appreciate it. Also for the polynomial, when I find the roots , how are those included in my graph?

  8. phi
    • 3 years ago
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    if you have y = f(x) then the roots tell you were y=0 it is where the curve crosses the x-axis

  9. dpaInc
    • 3 years ago
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    in addition to the rational function i mentioned, g(x) and h(x) must be relatively prime.....

  10. CalculusHelp
    • 3 years ago
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    Oh I get it now, thanks a lot!

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