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godorovg

  • 2 years ago

anyone feeling lucky tonight? I need another way to understand dot product rule in vectors?

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  1. Kainui
    • 2 years ago
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    Well in what way do you understand the dot product rule as it stands? lol

  2. godorovg
    • 2 years ago
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    that is what I am asking to see if I get a better grip on this from what a with roof plus b with roof = c roof that is what the dot rule is right??

  3. godorovg
    • 2 years ago
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    I can not draw on this board I am really bad at it..

  4. Kainui
    • 2 years ago
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    |dw:1345012754225:dw| That? That doesn't look like a product to me, looks like a sum.

  5. godorovg
    • 2 years ago
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    okay, than I have this mixed up help me to get this straight plz

  6. borcarlo
    • 2 years ago
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    |dw:1345012796701:dw|

  7. borcarlo
    • 2 years ago
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    I don't know if I'm answering your question, hope it helps.

  8. godorovg
    • 2 years ago
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    the sum rule is what I posted the first time, why is this called the dot rule?"

  9. godorovg
    • 2 years ago
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    I know using this the dot you dots, but why? dots mostly means times in math.

  10. borcarlo
    • 2 years ago
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    Ok, so be clearer with your question.

  11. Kainui
    • 2 years ago
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    The dot product is \[A*B=ABcos \theta \] while the cross product is \[AxB=ABsin \theta \]

  12. godorovg
    • 2 years ago
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    sorry I am trying too, here this is still new to me bare with me. Sorry if I have caused problems here or anything.

  13. borcarlo
    • 2 years ago
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    No but the thing is we don't to understand your question, actually I don't.

  14. borcarlo
    • 2 years ago
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    seem*

  15. godorovg
    • 2 years ago
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    I am trying to put this in words, I am not not using the right words here. The dot product is A∗B=ABcosθ this is what I am asking for and why and help me to understand the concept here

  16. borcarlo
    • 2 years ago
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    Imagine you have a vector say (1, 2)=a right, the length 2 is the portion of (1,2) on the y axis. There I took the dot product a°y^= (0,2) . So the dot product allows you make that same thing with any vector.

  17. Kainui
    • 2 years ago
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    I learned it in terms of flux. How many field lines are going through an area, for instance. So let's look at the two extremes. Remember that an area's vector is pointing out, perpendicular to the length and width of it. |dw:1345014748903:dw| So here we see on the left that the cosine of the angle between the two is 0, and the cosine of 0 is 1. So we have 100% flux through the area of electric field lines. Now in the right side we see that the electric field lines are going perpendicular to the area, so none of the field lines are traveling through the area. Cosine of 90 degrees is indeed 0, so we see there is no flux.

  18. godorovg
    • 2 years ago
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    thanks

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