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EmilyJernigan Group Title

Find the amplitude of the sine curve shown below.

  • one year ago
  • one year ago

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  1. EmilyJernigan Group Title
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    • one year ago
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  2. completeidiot Group Title
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    amplitude is just the height of the sine curve

    • one year ago
  3. EmilyJernigan Group Title
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    How do i do that? :/

    • one year ago
  4. vf321 Group Title
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    Maximum value - minimum value divided by 2

    • one year ago
  5. EmilyJernigan Group Title
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    How do i work this out? I have no clue

    • one year ago
  6. vf321 Group Title
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    I.e., A regular sine curve has a minimum value at -pi/2, equal to -1. At +pi/2, it's value is 1. Thus, you have \[\frac{1-(-1)}{2}=1\]For your curve, what're the max and min values?

    • one year ago
  7. EmilyJernigan Group Title
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    4, -4?

    • one year ago
  8. vf321 Group Title
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    Yes. Now what do you do?

    • one year ago
  9. bronzegoddess Group Title
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    the amplitude is 4, because if you look at the graph.. the amplitude is from zero to the highest point.

    • one year ago
  10. jim_thompson5910 Group Title
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    or amplitude = distance from middle to either extreme

    • one year ago
  11. vf321 Group Title
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    @bronzegoddess "from zero" is not a solution for all possible sine curves. For example, sin(x)+1, "from zero" has an amplitude of 2, whereas in reality it's 1. @jim_thompson5910 yeah that's right but not rigidly defined.

    • one year ago
  12. jim_thompson5910 Group Title
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    true, but it's a good way to think about it

    • one year ago
  13. jim_thompson5910 Group Title
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    it's a basic way at least, if you get too rigorous, then you may confuse things (at least in my opinion)

    • one year ago
  14. vf321 Group Title
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    Well that's why I didn't start getting into domains and formal declarations and such...

    • one year ago
  15. jim_thompson5910 Group Title
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    lol yeah, don't need to get into those ideas (just yet)

    • one year ago
  16. bronzegoddess Group Title
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    @vf321 its a simple way to think about it sorry if I am wrong.. if I was given an example like sin(x)+1 I would know that the amplitude is 1 because Asinx(Bx-C)+D, the amplitude is the number before the sin.

    • one year ago
  17. vf321 Group Title
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    @bronzegoddess yes of course no attack intended just didn't want @EmilyJernigan to use that method since she doesn't have the same intuition about it that you do.

    • one year ago
  18. bronzegoddess Group Title
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    its okay, no harm intended on my part too :)

    • one year ago
  19. bronzegoddess Group Title
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    @vf321 do you think you could explain relations to me?

    • one year ago
  20. vf321 Group Title
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    realtions? What do you mean?

    • one year ago
  21. vf321 Group Title
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    Make a question about it and address all points. It's a bit informal doing it on someone else's question.

    • one year ago
  22. bronzegoddess Group Title
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    okay'll switch, I just wanted to know if you could help.

    • one year ago
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