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zipp

  • 3 years ago

I'm new to trigonometry. Can someone help me. Convert each angle in degrees to radians. Express your answer as a multiple of π. 240°.

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  1. lgbasallote
    • 3 years ago
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    to change degree to radian just multiply by \(\frac{\pi}{180}\)

  2. cwrw238
    • 3 years ago
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    hint: 180 degrees = pi radians

  3. Hero
    • 3 years ago
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    Whatever the angle is, multiply it by \(\frac{\pi}{180}\)

  4. Hero
    • 3 years ago
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    then simplify it

  5. cwrw238
    • 3 years ago
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    |dw:1345507411813:dw|

  6. Calcmathlete
    • 3 years ago
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    Alright. Radians can be very simple once you understand what you're doing. You're basically multiplying by a conversion factor. Conversion factors always have a value of 1. For instance, \(\LARGE\frac{1 m}{100cm}\) is a conversion factor. The conversion factor you use here is \(\LARGE\frac{π}{180º}\) and \(\LARGE \frac{180º}{π}\). It varies depending on which one you are doing. \(\LARGE\frac{π}{180º} \)is used to convert from degrees to radians. \(\LARGE \frac{180º}{π}\) is used to convert radians to degrees. Here's what happens in each case. Let's say we have 2π and we're trying to convert it to degrees. \[\frac{2π}{1} \times \frac{180º}{π} \implies 2\cancel{π} \times \frac{180º}{\cancel{π}} \implies 360º\]Now let's say you have 360º and you need to convert it to radians. \[360º \times \frac{π}{180º} \implies 360\cancel{º} \times \frac{π}{180\cancel{º}} \implies \frac{360π}{180} \implies 2π\]Do you see how to do it now?

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