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AudrianaS

Find the x-intercepts: 2(x-5)^2=17

  • one year ago
  • one year ago

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  1. manishsatywali
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    x= [17/2]^1/2 +5|dw:1345790422320:dw|

    • one year ago
  2. dpaInc
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    x-intercepts? this is an equation in one variable.... how do you do that?

    • one year ago
  3. panlac01
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    http://finedrafts.com/files/Larson%20PreCal%208th/Larson%20Precal%20CH2.pdf

    • one year ago
  4. AudrianaS
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    Am I suppose to distribute the 2?

    • one year ago
  5. dpaInc
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    ahh.... my bad.... because this is an equation in one variable, it is just a vertical line.... so solving for x will give you the only x-intercept....

    • one year ago
  6. panlac01
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    since this is a quadratic function, you will get 2 values for the x-intercepts. read pp 126-129 in the link I've posted above.

    • one year ago
  7. RolyPoly
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    2 x-intercepts? \[2(x-5)^2=17\]Divide both sides by 2\[(x-5)^2=\frac{17}{2}\]Take square roots for both sides \[(x-5)=\pm \frac{17}{2}\]Add 5 to both sides to get the answer.

    • one year ago
  8. RolyPoly
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    I'm always late....

    • one year ago
  9. AudrianaS
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    oh okay thank you that makes so much sense :)

    • one year ago
  10. dpaInc
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    hold on folks... this is an equation in x only.... this is a vertical line.... and not a function.... "Find the x-intercepts: 2(x-5)^2=17"

    • one year ago
  11. RolyPoly
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    Wow. That's complicated. I thought all I had to do was to solve it but seems not :(

    • one year ago
  12. dpaInc
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    this is a function: y = 2(x-5)^2 this is not a function: 17 = 2(x-5)^2

    • one year ago
  13. panlac01
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    parabolas always have 2 x-intercepts unless k=0, is it not?

    • one year ago
  14. RolyPoly
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    But how to get the x-intercept(s)??? There is no y...

    • one year ago
  15. dpaInc
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    in any function, to find the x-intercepts, set y=0 and solve.... how are you gonna set y=0 in the equation 2(x-5)^2 =17 ????

    • one year ago
  16. razor99
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    Think the x-intercept is 8.5,0

    • one year ago
  17. RolyPoly
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    Perhaps this would be the case? y = 2(x-5)^2-17 Put y=0 2(x-5)^2-17 = 0 2(x-5)^2=17 . . . Solve x to find the x-intercepts. Hmm...

    • one year ago
  18. panlac01
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    dpalnc solved it, x=5 - sqrt(17/2) x=5+ sqrt(17/2)

    • one year ago
  19. dpaInc
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    compare these two equations: y = x + 3 and 17 = x + 3 that first one is a line and you can find the x-intercept by setting y=0 then solving 0 = x + 3. but that second equation is just a vertical line....

    • one year ago
  20. RolyPoly
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    Eh?! Then, for 17=x+3, the x-intercept is 17-3 = 14?!

    • one year ago
  21. lgbasallote
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    you have been trolled

    • one year ago
  22. dpaInc
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    dang this chrome browser.... x = 14 is a vertical line and that's where it crosses the x-axis.... but back to the problem... did i say 1 x-intercept? i mean two as panlac says.... :)

    • one year ago
  23. panlac01
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    LOL

    • one year ago
  24. lgbasallote
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    a vertical line that curves...obviously troll ^^

    • one year ago
  25. dpaInc
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    how 'bout two vertical lines... it's implied when u solve a quadratic you have to consider the positive and negative square root....

    • one year ago
  26. lgbasallote
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    ^trOWL

    • one year ago
  27. dpaInc
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    yeah buwahhahahahaha

    • one year ago
  28. dpaInc
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    ang troll ^^^

    • one year ago
  29. lgbasallote
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    this goes against the teachings of the monks... the forefathers defined x-intercept as "the value of y when x is 0" however, there is no y....

    • one year ago
  30. lgbasallote
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    this is not a function

    • one year ago
  31. dpaInc
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    right... so when you solve for x in that equation, you get two vertical lines... an equation in only 1 variable x is not a function...

    • one year ago
  32. lgbasallote
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    no. this is just not a function. nothing more; nothing less

    • one year ago
  33. lgbasallote
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    it's a relation, but not a function

    • one year ago
  34. lgbasallote
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    x-intercepts occur in function only

    • one year ago
  35. dpaInc
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    when did i say it is a function?

    • one year ago
  36. panlac01
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    I said it was, my mistake

    • one year ago
  37. lgbasallote
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    you were saying it had an x-intercept

    • one year ago
  38. panlac01
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    two values for x...

    • one year ago
  39. lgbasallote
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    it has values for x...but no x-intercept

    • one year ago
  40. dpaInc
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    but the vertical line intercepts the x-axis...

    • one year ago
  41. panlac01
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    yes. LG you are right

    • one year ago
  42. lgbasallote
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    http://mathworld.wolfram.com/x-Intercept.html "The point at which a curve or FUNCTION crosses the x-axis (i.e., when in two dimensions)."

    • one year ago
  43. lgbasallote
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    like i said. you got trolled

    • one year ago
  44. panlac01
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    cross or touches...

    • one year ago
  45. dpaInc
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    so are you saying that a circle (which is a curve) does not have x-intercepts?

    • one year ago
  46. lgbasallote
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    yes it doesnt. it's not a function

    • one year ago
  47. panlac01
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    circle is not a function

    • one year ago
  48. lgbasallote
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    neither do ellipses

    • one year ago
  49. panlac01
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    function = 1 to 1 value

    • one year ago
  50. dpaInc
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    so why can't you call the where a vertical line crosses the the x-axis the x-intercept?

    • one year ago
  51. lgbasallote
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    any closed figure is not a function. it is a plane

    • one year ago
  52. panlac01
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    this is going beyond the problem now... bottom line: x has two values

    • one year ago
  53. dpaInc
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    i agree to agree... if that makes sense....

    • one year ago
  54. dpaInc
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    hey LG... i thnk u scared off the asker.... or he/she got bored...

    • one year ago
  55. panlac01
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    did she ask the problem to be graphed?

    • one year ago
  56. panlac01
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    lol jk. let us just leave it

    • one year ago
  57. lgbasallote
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    i would like to quote myself "you got trolled" relations have x-intercepts too http://en.wikibooks.org/wiki/Algebra/Intercepts

    • one year ago
  58. dpaInc
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    yes.... let's graph it....

    • one year ago
  59. panlac01
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    this is really going beyond now... why can't we agree that the intercepts are where either the vertical line or horizontal line are touched or crossed? did I start the fire when I said it was a function? I retracted it so OS can be a better place for students once again...

    • one year ago
  60. dpaInc
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    sorry man... i just miss talkin to LG....

    • one year ago
  61. dpaInc
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    u know u'd make a great ambassador for keeping the peace....:)

    • one year ago
  62. dpaInc
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    so peace to everyone.....:)

    • one year ago
  63. panlac01
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    I'd be damned...

    • one year ago
  64. dpaInc
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    lol...

    • one year ago
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