anonymous
  • anonymous
I have a doubt in the answer key to the problem on law of conservation of momentum. The question: A girl of mass 50 kg jumps out of a rowing boat of mass 300 kg on to the bank with a horizontal velocity of 3 m/s. With what velocity does the boat move backwards? Answer key says: m1(mass of girl) = 50 kg m2(mass of boat) = 300kg v1(velocity of girl) = 3 m/s v2 = ? m1v1 + m2v2 = 0 How can the momentum of the whole system after the girl jumps out of the boat be 0? The boat will have some momentum right?
Physics
  • Stacey Warren - Expert brainly.com
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SOLVED
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chestercat
  • chestercat
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Xishem
  • Xishem
Right. The boat must have some change in velocity, since the momentum must be conserved and the momentum of the girl changed.
anonymous
  • anonymous
it is just same as recoil velocity of Gun..
anonymous
  • anonymous
but even in recoiling of gun, how can the final momentum be 0?

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More answers

anonymous
  • anonymous
v = - Mv/m = -50*3/300 = -0.5m/s
anonymous
  • anonymous
Yes, I know the answer but I can't understand how total momentum is 0.
anonymous
  • anonymous
Law of conservation of momentum..says that momentum is conserved
anonymous
  • anonymous
Do..u knw abt Rocket propulsion
Xishem
  • Xishem
Momenta are vectors.
Xishem
  • Xishem
If you have two vectors in opposite directions, they can cancel eachother out.
anonymous
  • anonymous
even though the mass gets reduced..the momentum is conserved
anonymous
  • anonymous
even if they are different?
Xishem
  • Xishem
The girl's momentum is in one direction and the boat's in another direction.
anonymous
  • anonymous
yup..@Xishem has a point there
anonymous
  • anonymous
I mean do they cancel each other even if the magnitudes are different?
Xishem
  • Xishem
The magnitudes aren't different.
Xishem
  • Xishem
Remember, momentum is a function of both mass and velocity.
Xishem
  • Xishem
If one object with 1kg mass and 10m/s velocity is moving right and another of 10kg mass and 1m/s velocity is moving left, the total momentum is zero.
anonymous
  • anonymous
So mass*velocity of the bullet or girl will always be equal to mass*velocity of gun or boat?
Xishem
  • Xishem
Yes, assuming you are in a closed system. Which you are.
anonymous
  • anonymous
What is a closed system?
anonymous
  • anonymous
Please help I have a test coming up soon.
Xishem
  • Xishem
A closed system is a physical system which doesn't exchange any matter in or out of itself and which isn't affected by outside forces.
Xishem
  • Xishem
It basically just means that you are only considering the two objects and not nonconservative forces like friction which would change the overall momentum. (This case is frictionless, but that's one case where momentum won't be conserved).
anonymous
  • anonymous
Thanks I got it now.
anonymous
  • anonymous
This doesn't happen in the case of a collision right?
Xishem
  • Xishem
Momentum is not conserved in an inelastic collision. Momentum is conserved in an elastic collision.
Xishem
  • Xishem
In the real world, momentum is never conserved in collisions. When two pool balls hit eachother for instance, they release some sound upon impact -- this is lost energy. They are also always under the effect of friction from the table.
anonymous
  • anonymous
Thanks.

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