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cinar

I need some help these discrete math questions: For each part below, find the number of passwords that fit the condition. (a) The password has 10 alphanumeric characters, but is not case-sensitive. (b) The password has 10 to 12 alphanumeric characters, and is case-sensitive. (c) The password has 10 case-sensitive alphanumeric characters, and exactly 3 of them are numerical. (d) The password has 10 case-sensitive alphanumeric characters, exactly 3 of them are numerical, and no numerical character is repeated.

  • one year ago
  • one year ago

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  1. cinar
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    a) I found like 36^10 but I'm not sure..

    • one year ago
  2. amistre64
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    if alphanumeric defines just letters and numbers, then yes, there are 36 options for each position.

    • one year ago
  3. amistre64
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    26*2 = 52 + 10 = 62, there are 62 options for each position with some modifications i believe for the b part

    • one year ago
  4. cinar
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    http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Alphanumeric

    • one year ago
  5. cinar
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    I thought that in that way..

    • one year ago
  6. amistre64
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    62^10+62^11+62^12 is what im thinking for b such that abcdefghij differs from 0abcdefghij, 00abcdefghij

    • one year ago
  7. cinar
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    what does 10 to 12 alphanumeric characters mean, can we choose 10 alphanumeric, 11 alphanumeric or 12 alphanumeric ?

    • one year ago
  8. amistre64
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    yes

    • one year ago
  9. cinar
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    hmm, it makes sense now..

    • one year ago
  10. cinar
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    for c 52^7*10^3

    • one year ago
  11. amistre64
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    for c im thinking: N,N,N,a,a,a,a,a,a,a given that N has 10 and a has 52 \[10C3~(10^3+52^7)\]but that wouldnt account for 333 being the same as 333 would it

    • one year ago
  12. amistre64
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    im over thinking that one ...

    • one year ago
  13. cinar
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    I guess my solution is just valid for if first three passwords is number....right..

    • one year ago
  14. amistre64
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    yes, since there is not a position defined, we would have to take that value and multiply it by the number of ways the positions can change

    • one year ago
  15. amistre64
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    the last one is the same as the one before it, we just have to subtract the set of "same numbers" NNN NNn NnN nNN there appears to be 4 ways that that set can be arranged, so all we would have to do is figure out how many are in the set to begin with

    • one year ago
  16. amistre64
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    001 991 010 ... 919 ; 10 ways 100 199 002 992 020 ... 929 200 299 ... 009 999 090 ... 999 900 999 ----- 10 ways is it safe to say there are 100 ways to get duplicated numbers? or am i introducing a double count?

    • one year ago
  17. amistre64
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    3*10*10 = 300 ways .... and yes there are some double counts

    • one year ago
  18. amistre64
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    i cant think thru that one :/

    • one year ago
  19. cinar
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    can we say for c 10^35*2^7*62^10

    • one year ago
  20. amistre64
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    for c; 10^3*52^7 is valid for one positional set up there are \[\frac{10!}{3!7!}\]distinct ways to set it up

    • one year ago
  21. cinar
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    typo 10^3

    • one year ago
  22. amistre64
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    10.9.8 = 720 ; /6 = 120 distinct ways

    • one year ago
  23. cinar
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    but you added them previous solution, was your that solution wrong,,

    • one year ago
  24. amistre64
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    the addition was a mistake on my part ... brain fell asleep while typing :)

    • one year ago
  25. cinar
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    yeah, brains do that sometimes (:

    • one year ago
  26. amistre64
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    001 991 010 ... 919 ; 10 ways ... but 111,111,111 suggests that we need to adjust 100 199 by subtracting 2 3*10 -2 = 28, there are 10 ways to run thru this making: c - 280 can we see any issues with this idea for "d" ?

    • one year ago
  27. cinar
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    |dw:1346353576368:dw|

    • one year ago
  28. cinar
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    we have this situation for above case rigth

    • one year ago
  29. amistre64
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    something similar to that yes

    • one year ago
  30. cinar
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    I am gonna think over that later, you wanna see my other question, if you don't I don't mind (:

    • one year ago
  31. cinar
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    let assume we have small case for d) N={1,2,3,4} A={A,B,C,D,E,F}

    • one year ago
  32. cinar
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    and let say we have 2 number and password is 4 digit

    • one year ago
  33. cinar
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    if we can solve this we can also solve d (:

    • one year ago
  34. amistre64
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    000 001 002 003 004 005 006 007 008 009 010 020 030 040 050 060 070 080 090 100 200 300 400 500 600 700 800 900 110 111 112 113 114 115 116 117 118 119 101 121 131 141 151 161 171 181 191 011 211 311 411 511 611 711 811 911 220 221 222 223 224 225 226 227 228 229 202 212 232 242 252 262 272 282 292 022 122 322 422 522 622 722 822 922 330 331 332 333 334 335 336 337 338 339 303 313 323 343 353 363 373 383 393 033 133 233 433 533 633 733 833 933 i cant see an issue with it ....

    • one year ago
  35. amistre64
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    i cant make out this instruction: "and let say we have 2 number and password is 4 digit"

    • one year ago
  36. cinar
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    It seems logical..

    • one year ago
  37. cinar
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    |dw:1346354587103:dw| I wanted ask actually this..

    • one year ago
  38. amistre64
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    4*4*5*5, any restrictions on doubles?

    • one year ago
  39. amistre64
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    or positions?

    • one year ago
  40. cinar
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    it is the same question with d just small elements, don't worry about it, your last solution works well.. thanks man..

    • one year ago
  41. cinar
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    my offer is still valid, you wanna see my other question (:

    • one year ago
  42. amistre64
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    sure, whats the other question :)

    • one year ago
  43. cinar
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    I gotta go now, I'll try to solve myself at home tonight, and if I have some trouble I'll post it here and I'll call your name, thank you so much again, see you later..

    • one year ago
  44. amistre64
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    good luck :)

    • one year ago
  45. cinar
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    thanks, I need that (:

    • one year ago
  46. cinar
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    I got now question c, C(10,3) for position of this 3 numbers in 10 slot, but we can also use C(10,7) for position of the letters in 10 slot right. It odes not matter we are choosing number or letter, and also we know this C(10,3)=C(10,7)..

    • one year ago
  47. cinar
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    for d) we are looking for number of non-repeated 3 digit number, right? to do that, 10*10*10= repeated is allowed, 10*9*8=repeated is not allowed so, 10*10*10-10*9*8= 280 =number of non-repeated 3 digit number..

    • one year ago
  48. cinar
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    so answer is for d) 10^3*52^7*C(10,3)-280*52^7*C(10,3) can we say this? or is this true?

    • one year ago
  49. cinar
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    720*52^7*C(10,3) there are 720 non-repeated numbers

    • one year ago
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